Archival Clothing - Made in USA

Archive for May, 2009

Archival Baggage: Billykirk Field Bag

May 24th, 2009



Billykirk waxed cotton field bag

Although I have no earthly need for another bag of any kind (messenger, musette or otherwise), I’m coveting this new field bag by Billykirk. In my mind, the BK bag fills the niche between my Frost River cartridge bag (flimsy) and Filson medium field bag (heavy on the shoulder for cycling). The Billykirk bag combines a waxed cotton main body w/soft leather side and back panels (resembling, through bag ancestry, this Orvis Battenkill field shoulder bag). It has the light (nearly foldable) weight of a musette with the more advanced pocketing of a traditional shoulder (or shell) bag. Although the leather paneling dresses up the bag, it makes it a bit luxe (for me) for daily use. However, I’ve heard that future iterations of the bag might be made in full waxed cotton. Trying to decide on color options: olive, tan or black?

I was chirped at by a Portland “concept store” for taking photos of the Billy Kirk bag–so I apologize for their hurry-up, spy shot quality (no privileged access for me).
For context, a few other field shoulder bag examples:
Frost River shell bag (poor shoulder strap design)
Filson tin cloth medium field bag (nice save for those plastic clasps)

Military field bag (austerity model)

Hunting World options

Heritage military uniforms for women

May 21st, 2009

Auxilary Fire Service
Auxilary Territorial Service
Red Cross Officers’ Outdoor Uniform
Volunteer’s uniform in the A.T.S.
Auxilary Fire Service

Mechanised Transport Corps

W.V.S

Auxilary Air Force (Officer’s Uniform)

Women’s Voluntary Service

Land Army
From the archives of the Illustrated London News, here are some WWII uniforms for the women’s auxilary service (“its members attend to cooking–their most important work—stewarding, all kinds of clerical work, motor driving, coding, and also serve as telephonists”).

Some of these uniforms, and accessories, seem ready for re-issue by History Preservation Associates (“Linking You With the Past”). My personal favorite is the Land Army ensemble (buckets, brogues and breeks).



Badges

Air-raid shelter provisions

Mathematics in action

Shopping from 1968: Hunting World

May 20th, 2009

Hunting World Catalog 1968

Spanish leathe “Versatote” (on my Archival Finder list)
More English Fishing Bags (made by Brady, no doubt)
Expedition Canvas Tentage
Kalahari Grill and Fish Locator Glasses
A few more shopping cart items from the catalog that brought you the Springbok hassok, chromed steel “supercube” furniture and genuine zebra luggage tags. Apart from the overabundance of African trophy skins (“obtained by licensed hunters and landowners”), the 1968 Hunting World catalog remains a terrific source for top quality British canvas and Spanish leather game & field bags. One can still locate British versions of thes bags in the catalog by way of Brady (whose models retain the same names). However, I would add the Spanish-made leather “versatote” to my own archival finder last. Wondering if that same small, 5-man saddlemakers shop in the Spanish mountains is still open and available for custom orders.
Hunting World 1975 coming soon (elephant skin loafers and brass pocket pepper grinders!).

Archival Finder: Andy’s jacket, Woody’s shoes & Italian motorcycle trousers

May 19th, 2009

In the last few months, I’ve received a number of emails from people trying to a) locate out-of-production clothing b) identify clothing worn in movies or c) track down a clothing type or style w/no identifiable brand or vintage. I’m reprinting a few requests today to see if others might be able to assist in identifying and/or sourcing of these ephemeral items.


Andy in China
First up is a request from Daniel M. from London. Daniel is trying to identify the make and model of a fishing/photog jacket worn by Andy Warhol in the book, Andy in China. Daniel writes:

On scrutinizing the images I could not make out the manufacturers name but it looked like it ended ‘oma’ Could you advise what the manufacturers name is or where a copy could be purchased from?

I have to admit that I’m not a fan of synthetics. But I do love the pocketing on this jacket. I’d just have mine remanufactured in a nice light cotton poplin. Closest modern reissue might be this Woolrich Relaunch.


I wouldn’t be surprised if Andy’s outfit was inspired by some of the modern angler’s wear (“khaki mist silicone treated gabardine”) sold by Hunting World, a high end Manhattan sportswear and Safari outfitter popular in the 1970s.



Hunting World Catalog 1975

Another email request comes from an anonymous reader pining for a pair of work-type shoes worn by Woody Allen in Annie Hall. He writes:

The shoes appear, to my untrained eye, to look like welted, moc toe work… shoes? They look nearly identical to some crepe sole red wing boots I own. Have you ever known of a such a shoe? This was Woody in the 70’s, so I’m sure it was American made. I’d appreciate any info you could share. – an anonymous (thankful) reader.


Annie Hall (Allen 1977)


I feel like I’ve seen these shoes a thousand times on the racks in Goodwill (not that they’re not worth tracking down again). But I have no clue about their make or model. Apologies. Any general suggestions or ideas?



Vintage Italian Motorcycle Trousers

Finally, Indigo Slims blogger Jennifer sent in a request on behalf of a friend and motorcyle enthusiast. She reports that her friend is trying to find some stylish trousers to match his new Belstaff jacket:

He’s a keen bike rider, and has invested in a traditional Belstaff jacket with metal protective plates etc (that weighs about a ton), but can’t find trousers to complete his planned kit. He’s a traditional chap (a fan of Old Town in Norfolk, who I see you’ve found before me as they’re already on your approved list!), and has found pictures (attached) of vintage Italian army motorbike trousers. He’s asked if I have any suggestions as to who might be willing to re-create these, and I’m wondering if you in turn had any ideas? I’m going to suggest he talk to British Millerain as they may have some ideas, but other than getting a pair made specially by a tailor, I couldn’t think of [other possible resources].

Personally, I’d recommend shopping from the past. I love the old, 1950s-era Barbour motorcycle suits shown in reprints of the older catalogs (below). I’m wondering whether it would be possible to have Barbour create a custom pair of motorcycle trousers based on one of their vintage patterns. They may even have a pattern in their archives that closely resembles the details of the Italian motorbike trousers

Barbour Catalog Reprint

Shopping again from 1968: Hunting World

May 16th, 2009
Hunting World Catalog 1968

Spanish leathe “Versatote” (on my Archival Finder list)

More English Fishing Bags (made by Brady, no doubt)

Expedition Canvas Tentage

Kalahari Hibachi and Fish Locator Glasses


A few more shopping cart items from the catalog that brought you the Springbok hassok, chromed steel “supercube” furniture and genuine zebra luggage tags. Apart from the over-use of decorative animal skins and aristocratic tsotchkes, the 1968 Hunting World catalog remains an enviable source for top quality British and Spanish game bags. One can still locate the British versions by way of Brady (whose models retain the same model names). However, I would add the Spanish made leather “versatote” to my own archival finder last. Wondering if that same small 5-man shop outside of Madrid is still open and available for collaborative projects.

Archival Finder: Warhol’s Jacket, Woody’s Shoes and Italian Motorcycle Trousers

May 14th, 2009

In the last few months, I’ve received a number of emails from people trying to a) locate out-of-production clothing b) identify clothing worn in movies or c) track down a clothing type or style w/no identifiable brand or vintage. I’m reprinting a few requests today to see if others might be able to assist in identifying and/or sourcing of these ephemeral items.


Make/Model/Vintage of this jacket?
First up is a request from Daniel M. from London. Daniel is trying to identify the make and model of a fishing or photog jacket worn by Andy Warhol in the book, Andy in China. Daniel writes:
On scrutinizing the images I could not make out the manufacturers name but it looked like it ended ‘oma’ Could you advise what the manufacturers name is or where a copy could be purchased from?

I have to admit that I’m not a fan of synthetics. But I do love the general pocketing and style of this jacket. I’d just have mine remanufactured in a nice light cotton poplin. Closest modern reissue might be this Woolrich Relaunch jacket (at least in the pocketing detail).


Who made these shoes?

Another email came from an anonymous reader pining for a pair of shoes worn by Woody Allen in Annie Hall. He writes:

The shoes appear, to my untrained eye, to look like welted, moc toe work… shoes? They look nearly identical to some crepe sole red wing boots I own. Have you ever known of a such a shoe? This was Woody in the 70’s, so I’m sure it was American made. I’d appreciate any info you could share. – an anonymous (thankful) reader

Friend Erin suggested that they might be an early Dexter moc toe work shoe. Other ideas?


Finally, Indigo Slims blogger Jennifer sent in a question on behalf of a friend. She notes that her friend, a motorcycle enthusiast, is trying to find stylish trousers to match his new Belstaff jacket. She says:

He’s a keen bike rider, and has invested in a traditional Belstaff jacket with metal protective plates etc (that weighs about a ton), but can’t find trousers to complete his planned kit. He’s a traditional chap (a fan of Old Town in Norfolk, who I see you’ve found before me as they’re already on your approved list!), and has found pictures (attached) of vintage Italian army motorbike trousers. He’s asked if I have any suggestions as to who might be willing to re-create these, and I wondered if you in turn had any ideas? I’m going to suggest he talks to British Millerain as they may have some ideas, but other than getting a pair made specially by a tailor, I couldn’t think.