Archival Clothing - Made in USA

Archive for September, 2009

Shopping from the Dartmouth Outing Club

September 23rd, 2009

Ed. note: Friend and Archival Clothing contributor Tom B. returns from summer break with a brief visual blurb on the classic style of his alma mater’s historic outing club.


During my time in college, I was very active in the Dartmouth Outing
Club
, the oldest collegiate outing club in the country. It’s a
terrific organization, running freshman orientation trips, maintaining
trails, and hosting scores of hikes, bikes, paddles, and climbs every
term. However, upon doing some digging in the club reports from years
past, I believe that sartorial standards have slipped dramatically.






A week ago, Tom field tested this lightweight, all cotton hiking ensemble (minus kerchief) inspired by the Dartmouth Outing club photo archives:


Canoe pack review

September 19th, 2009

Vintage Duluth packs

I don’t know the folks in these catalog-quality shots of Duluth canoe packs in action (more shots of Duluth packs and satchels courtesy this flickr photostream). But I love how they make real the prehistoric size of a true-to-life canoe pack. My main encounter with this style of pack (waxed or dry finish) is by way of catalog and web images that reduce everything to thumbnail scale. I contemplate buying a traditional canoe pack just for the visual punchline of wearing around a bag as big as me (tumpline in place).





Duluth Pack photos (courtesy this flickr photostream)

Speaking of canoe packs, Frost River (a former Duluth pack rival/offshoot) seems to have returned from the ashes. This week, ebay featured some deadstock items for sale by a new Frost River management group. I wanted to win this bag but die hard Frost River fans drove the auction price beyond my alpine rucksack pricepoint. For interested parties, the old FR website–with its old timey product illustrations–is back online at this new url. I’m archiving some sample illustrations in case the site disappears from view again.

Frost River Utility Pack

Frost River Woodsman Pack

Frost River Old No. 7 Pack

From Little Golden Book of Camping (courtesy thbonamici)

A & F Co. 1908 Advertisement

Tump line use illustrated

1942 updates

Shopping from the Dartmouth Outing Club

September 15th, 2009

Ed. note: Friend and Archival Clothing contributor Tom B. returns from summer break with a brief visual report on the classic style of his alma mater’s historic outing club.


During my time in college, I was very active in the Dartmouth Outing
Club
, the oldest collegiate outing club in the country. It’s a
terrific organization, running freshman orientation trips, maintaining
trails, and hosting scores of hikes, bikes, paddles, and climbs every
term. However, upon doing some digging in the club reports from years
past, I believe that sartorial standards have slipped dramatically.






A week ago, Tom field tested this lightweight, all cotton hiking ensemble (minus kerchief) modeled on a photo from the Outing club archives:

Shopping from 1999: David Morgan Catalog

September 13th, 2009
Same plain brown cover in 2009

No longer available: Dale walking trousers

Early source for Bills Khakis

Hickory shirts and logger buttons

Brilliant belt selection


Filson (i.d. the discontinued items)
Akurbra hats (someone should wear them)
No longer available: Nova Scotia woolens

David Morgan is one of the few remaining mail order companies that still sends out a print catalog. As far as I can tell, the catalog has not changed in appearance since I first started receiving copies in the early 90s (requested during my first search for a filson wool cruiser). While a David Morgan 1999 catalog may look like a 2009 catalog (same typeface, same layout, same grayscale photography, same brown cover) much has changed in the last ten years. The Bosca coin purse is now made in China and costs 43.00 (it used to be a 24.00 staple). Nova Scotia textiles and Alpendale are now out of business. Filson no longer offers Oregon-made wool whipcord or moleskin trousers and some of the original Filson styles have disappeared.

Nevertheless, the catalog continues to offer many worthy archival garments and accessories.

Here are three of my favorite items from the 2009 catalog:

Braided cinch belt

Addendum: check out the David Morgan sale section which frequently features discontinued items and sale priced Filson (plus oddball sizes of Bills Khakis and hardship woolens).

Archival Office Supplies: Rhodia Notebooks

September 10th, 2009

Ed. Note: Friend Lynn M. and I love French-made Rhodia notebooks (in 1997, Rhodia was acquired by my other favorite stationary company, Clairefontaine). I maintain a large personal archive of used/unused Rhodia notebooks in oddball sizes. My personal favorite is Rhodia 8, a narrow, oblong pad with gridded paper. In this Archival Clothing guest post, Lynn documents her current preference for Rhodia N° 16. To follow along, or pick your own favorite, click this link to view the full Rhodia line (but strike the metallic collection from memory).

A Notebook Fit for the Archive


My daily notebook companion is a Rhodia. My current obsession is a black covered N° 16 lined pad.

Undersized at 6″ x 8 1/4″ it fits perfectly inside any of my daily errand bags.

The top stapled cover easily folds out of my way when I want unfettered notetaking.

I rely on my Rhodia for recording things I need from the store, what I should accomplish today and any observations made in transit.

The perforated tear sheets are handy when I’m the only one with a notebook, perfect when my daughter begs for a sheet of drawing paper.

I’ve been using Rhodia notebooks for more than a decade, the smaller ones for travel and disposable jots, the more substantive wire bound books to manage projects at work. I’ve even lately become a fan of the Rhodia weekly planner.

The design of Rhodia notebooks hasn’t changed since 1932 and they are made with the original quality standards. The notebooks are still manufactured in France, in the Alsace region, an area that I have actually visited. I am charmed by the idea that I have a mental image of countryside where they are produced.

Sure, there are other notebooks worth considering, but none are as distinctive as these orange and black beauties. Rhodia notebooks are one of the constants in my life, as comforting as coffee with an old friend.

Rhodia notebooks can be easily obtained online, but check first with your local stationary shop.

I’m lucky that in Boulder, McGuckins Hardware, Two Hands Paperie and Vickerey always have Rhodia notebooks in stock.


Archival addendum:

Satchel sized Rhodia 8

Archival checklist

Linden wood and lacquered Rhodia pencil

A notebook for every size bag