Archival Clothing - Made in USA

Archive for October, 2009

Archival Field Trip: PDX October 2009

October 31st, 2009

A few belated notes from a beginning-of-the-month (October) fieldtrip to Portland by way of the Oregon Randonneurs Bikenfest 200k (not pictured).


Sugar Cane Denim (not pictured) & Engineered Garments @ Blake

The shock of a properly fitting, size small, Filson Outfitter jacket


Custom tweed jacket @ Duchess

Billykirk leather tote @ Winn Perry


Scandanavian breakfast at Broder

Shoe shopping from Bicycling, Circa 1980

October 30th, 2009

A guest post by Archival Associate, Tom B.


Like Lesli, I pine for the ability to mail order from the past – just a single Montgomery Ward’s catalog would be acceptable. But I’m experiencing similar saudade as I leaf through Bicycling magazines from the early 1980s. The articles are fine, but it’s the advertisements that slay me. Imagine being able to buy a new Suntour Superbe gruppo! How about all those Avocet imports? Their re-branded Ofmega hubs and cranks are particularly tantalizing. And, even though I ride with clipless pedals, it’s the shoes in Bicycling that really make me wish that the advertised phone numbers would still link me to a pair of Bata Bikers for $14.95.








Shopping from 1976: Brady Bags

October 28th, 2009














Knowing my obsession with the history of British fishing bags, Brady Brothers was kind enough to loan me this original brochure from 1976. I’m told that when Brady was operating from Halesowen, England, they kept very few original advertisements or print catalogues. Brady issued a small brochure type catalogue every 10 or 15 years since nothing in the product line ever changed. At the time, British fishing and game bags were quite popular and there was usually a 2 year waiting list for a bag like the leather Brady cartridge bag. The small brochure from 1976 is the only one known to exist within the company.

I’d love to see the shopping list current readers would draw up from this catalogue. I own a few bags from this catalogue including the diminuitive Norfolk and the staggering Scot (webbing wider than my shoulder blade). Per Brady’s own notes, most of the items pictured in this catalogue are still available today (making the catalogue a bit of a peeking-into-the-past let down). I’m most curious about the items found on the “Miscellaneous” page of the brochure–namely the ferret bag, bridle leather dog collar and rabbit purse nets. I’m wondering if these items should be considered as key accessories in a future heritage clothing collection.

Shopping from 1921: Équipages Français

October 21st, 2009









Manufacture Francaise d’Armes & Cycles courtesy Pillpatt (agence Eureka)
Thanks to one of my favorite Archival finders, Robin E., who pointed me to this flickr set featuring pages from Manufacture Francaise, a French firearms and clothing catalog from 1921. Per an auction note for a related item: “Manufacture Francaise produced an annual catalogue with over 700 pages and thousands of images of various products for sale. The catalogue provides a great deal of information of every kind needful to Sportsmen, Cyclists, Anglers, Tourists, etc.”

Archival Knitwear: Devold of Norway

October 16th, 2009

Devold Blue Marine sweater w/zip

Devold Blue Marine sweater w/crew neck

Devold Nansen sweater w/high neck

Devold Islender Sweater

I love the look of SNS Herning knitwear, but if you need economical Scandinavian woolens for your ice-cap expedition, try Devold of Norway.

I’ve been using Devold Aquaduct baselayers for cycling for years. In colder conditions, and in the rain, I wear mattress layers of Devold plus a light wind vest. I’d rather get damp than overheat in a fully sleeved shell. Aquaduct knits can also be worn off the bike as a spread-collar type top layer in the style of Alexander of Fanny and Alexander (Bergman 1982).

For arctic conditions, I recommend one of Devold’s Blue Marine (Blaatroie) sweaters. Worn by North Sea fisherman in some past era, blue marine sweaters are knit from pure new wool using tightly knit worsted yarns. The sweaters are super durable (non-pilling) and work well for wear under waxed cotton jackets or vests. What I like best about the Blue Marine series is that they retain their original historical styling save for the patriotic addition of a Norwegian flag patches. That being said, here’s an example of a Devold nautical model I would not purchase from the past:

Devold Blue Marine w/zip and pockets

While I prefer shopping from the 19th century, Devold is offering a few “modern” tech woolens I might try. I’m a little unsure about the overarching look of the “Optimum” hoodie but I do like its use of a knit grid pattern and thumb loop holes. The optimum might make a nice addition to my post-apocalyptic layering system:



Archival Auction: 1882 Poirier Packsack

October 12th, 2009

Thanks to Archival Clothing reader Murat for directing me to this current ebay auction for an 1882 Duluth Poirier packsack. According to the seller, the three stitches on the front flap of the pack may indicate that the pack is a rare, original Duluth prototype (thus justifying the $100k Buy It Now option). The seller also directed me to a Duluth Pack youtube video featuring a canoe pack similar to the one up for auction. Side note: I never thought to search youtube for archival footage of historical canoe packs.






1882 Duluth Poirier Packsack (via this ebay auction)

Archival Knitwear: Devold of Norway

October 11th, 2009

Devold Blue Marine sweater w/zip

Devold Blue Marine sweater w/crew neck

Devold Nansen sweater w/high neck

Devold Islender Sweater

I love the look of SNS Herning knitwear, but if you’re looking for economical Scandanavian woolens for your Polar ice-cap expedition, try Devold of Norway.

I’ve been using Devold Aquaduct baselayers for cycling for years. In colder conditions, and in the rain, I prefer wearing mattress layers of Devold plus a light wind vest. I’d rather get damp than overheat in a fully sleeved shell. Off the bike, worn with the neck unzipped over a few baselayers, the Aquaduct layers makes me feel like one of the central characters is Fanny and Alexander.

For arctic conditions, I recommend one of Devold’s Blue Marine (Blaatroie) sweaters. Worn by North Sea fisherman of some era, the blue marine sweaters are knit from pure new wool using tightly knit worsted yarns. The sweaters are super durable (non-pilling) and work well for wear under waxed cotton jackets or vests. What I like best about the Blue Marine series is that they retain their original/vintage styling save for the modern addition of a Norwegian flag patch. But here’s an example of one Devold nautical model I would not purchase from the past.

Devold Blue Marine w/zip and pockets

While I prefer shopping from the 19th century, Devold is offering a few “modern” tech woolens that I might like to try. I’m a little unsure about the overarching look of this “Optimum” hoodie but I do like the use of the grid patterning and thumb loop holes. The optimum might make a nice addition to my post-apocalyptic layering system:



Shopping from Tintin: Hiking Garb

October 9th, 2009

Ed. note: guest post by Archival Associate and Tintin reader, Tom B.





There’s endless discussion on the genius of Tintin’s wardrobe. But let’s broaden the search. Tintin In Tibet offers some really terrific examples of hiking clothing – tennis sweaters, anoraks, plus fours, socks folded over boots. While I continue to use gaiters to keep snow out, I swear by my knickers for hiking and cross-country skiing – both my Woolrich wool and my Ibex soft shell knickers see a great deal of use during the winter. Now, has anyone found an anorak that could dodouble-duty for those seen in Tintin In Tibet?

Archival News: Filson Seconds Sale 2009

October 6th, 2009






Although the Filson Cruising shirts and coats from 1921 have sold out, you can still shop for good quality Filson items at the 2009 Seconds Sale.

Here’s what I know:

The public sale is open from 9:00 AM – 3:00PM Sunday October 25th. The sale will be held at Filson’s 3851 1st Ave S Seattle WA, 98134 address.

I’ve heard from Seconds Sale veterans that the event requires an early a.m. arrival and full combat readiness. Since I’ll be in Chicago on that day, I’ll be shopping for my own future Filson seconds via ebay where most of the items eventually migrate (look for the black slash across your garment tag).

If you do go, post photos and reports (I’ve yet to see a live action view of this event).

Good sport and good luck!

In the end, I think I prefer refab Filson to factory seconds.

Shopping from David Mamet: Hunting Suits

October 1st, 2009


Apparently, I missed the news that filmmaker David Mamet started his own line of vintage inspired, outdoor clothing in 1999 under the Joseph Morse Company label. Here’s what I learned from the Cambridge Companion to David Mamet:


Perhaps Mamet should have waited a decade to launch his clothing brand. Per earlier blog posts, I remain fascinated by how well stocked his films are with newly popular heritage brands like Barbour, Woolrich and Filson. In Heist, a film I have not seen since 2001, Gene Hackman wordlessly walks through the opening scene of the film in an all-waxed cotton hunting ensemble. Although I’m unsure of the make of the field jacket (it looked Filson until I saw the pocketing), I’m pretty sure Hackman’s bag is a J.W. Hulme Co. English field bag (or a rebadged version offered by Orvis). Another blogger will have to document the make and model of Hackman’s shotgun and field notebook.

While Mamet’s own brand of nostalgia may have failed, I disagree that the past and its historical styles cannot be repeated/improved upon/multiplied into the future. Perhaps Mamet was meant to offer his items exclusively through the visual catalog of his films rather than by way of flimsy retail outpots like Banana Republic (a point of sale for his original line). For the pricepoint, and for sizing options, I prefer shopping directly from Mamet’s movies themselves (coming up next: Winslow Boy).

I read that the motto of Mamet’s clothing line was Quiet in the Woods. This must have been the overarching direction for Hackman’s hunting ensemble in the opening scene of Heist:




Heist (Mamet 2001)

A hypothetical look at Hackman’s ensemble by way of a vintage print catalogue from another age:




Archival Addendums:

Ibex Loden vest

Slumming: Barbour quilted vest