Archival Clothing - Made in USA

Archive for July, 2010

From the Archives: Yakima Climbing Youth

July 30th, 2010


OK, we know that the Life archive has been endlessly passed around the circle, but it doesn’t mean that the images aren’t brilliant. Having grown up rock climbing, I’m stuck on these kids from Yakima, Washington, right now. You cannot fail with khakis, Chucks, and poplin anoraks. Sign me up.




LL adds: one hopes these gents purchased their archival camping supplies from Sears Tent & Awning–a venerable canvas awning and canopy company still open for business in Yakima, Washington.

Field Test: Archival Clothing Flap Musette

July 27th, 2010

by Chris Kostman

Tea everywhere, including from a “boat-in” tea shop along Dal Lake in Srinagar, Kashmir

Test-riding a cycle rickshaw in New Delhi, India

Chris Kostman, ultra-endurance cyclist and AdventureCORPS founder, is a self described musette fan. Kostman has been a hero of mine since 1993 when I read his article Mountain Bikes: Who Needs Them? in an issue of Bicycle Guide magazine.

Kostman in 1993 (“any bike, anywhere”)


Several months ago, Kostman wrote me suggesting that Archival Clothing offer one of our musettes in a size that would accommodate a 14″ mac laptop. He uses simple cotton Kucharik musettes to carry his laptop and sundry items. Although I couldn’t provide Chris with an Archival musette that met his size specifications, I persuaded him to purchase one of our waxed cotton flap musettes for his trip to India and Kashmir.

After returning home, Chris published the following field test report on his blog, XO-1.org:

I’m an absolute bag nut and very picky when it comes to the bags I purchase and utilize – for any purpose. For 95% of my bag needs, I rely on the built-to-last, American-made offerings from Red Oxx in Billings, MT. I literally have ten or more of them in use on a regular basis. When I head off on a roadtrip, or to produce an event, it’s a veritable rolling Red Oxx commercial! There’s more on my Red Oxx bags here on the Community Page on the AdventureCORPS site.

A recent two-week trip through India and Kashmir was “bagged” perfectly with three bags from Red Oxx: the Air Boss to hold all my clothes in a space-efficient, and wrinkle-free, manner; the Mini-Ruck as my airplane carry-on with camera gear, gifts, reading material, food, and more; and a Safari Beanos 5.5 as the “bottomless pit” duffle to hold sleeping bags, ground pads, hydration packs for hiking, extra shoes, and other bulky items not needed on a daily basis by our group of three.

I knew all my real packing, hauling, and storage needs would be handled well by my trip of Red Oxx bags, but I also wanted something something small and inconspicuous as my daily-use bag, especially for my large-size digital camera with extra lens, my Moleskine notebook, and the misc. items I’d want to carry every day such as hand sanitizer, energy bars, business cards, and a bottle of water.

Hopefully all of you know that musette bags began their legendary history in the military, then became de rigeur food-and-drink-hand-off bags in the professional cycling world.


I have used an ultra simple cotton musette by Kucharik for over a decade as a protective sleeve for my Mac laptops. When running to the PO, bank, tea shop, and the like I use the same Kucharik musette to carry small items. When I expect to have to carry a bunch of items on my bike – such as when stopping at my mailbox at the end of a long ride – I will carry the folded up musette in my jersey pocket to put to good use when needed. That particular musette has seen a zillion miles and a quadrillion uses, so I knew something along those lines, except more sturdily made and without any logos, would be perfect for my India and Kashmir trip.

Kostman’s well worn Kucharik musette

Enter the recently released musette bag from Archival Clothing, a blog business I’ve been following lately. I ordered one just before winging it to a time zone exactly 12.5 hours later than my own. What a wise purchase that proved to be!

I used the Archival Clothing musette bag every day, taking it everywhere I went. It served many duties, including camera bag, shopping bag, and mainly just keeping everything I needed on a daily basis in a handy, low-key, easy-to-use design. The bag slowly changed color over time, taking on a more rugged, and lived-in patina. I don’t plan to clean it any time soon; it keeps getting better looking. No doubt it will last forever, too.

In a few of shots below, you can see everything which I stuffed in it one day during the only “shopping spree” of the trip. That was in Dharamsala (more specifically, MacLeod Ganj), home of the Dalai Lama and many Tibetan refugees. The latter have some neat things for sale, and my two travel friends kept handing me stuff to carry in my musette, as it operated like a black hole into which we dropped everything. To sum up, this is one fantastic bag and I’ll never travel without it. (I’ll put it to good use on my bicycle in the near future, no doubt, and will post a follow-up report about that application as well.)

Kostman along the Lidder River in Pahalgam, Kashmir

You, too, can be blessed by, and photographed with, a spiritual guru for just a buck!


The Archival Clothing Musette Bag holds an awful lot of gear, and shopping finds, when necessary! Everything pictured was comfortably in the bag.

Field Test: Archival Clothing Flap Musette

July 26th, 2010

by Chris Kostman

Tea everywhere, including from a “boat-in” tea shop along Dal Lake in Srinagar, Kashmir.

Test-riding a cycle rickshaw in New Delhi, India

Chris Kostman, ultra-endurance cyclist and AdventureCORPS founder, is a self described musette fan. Kostman has been a hero of mine ever since I read his 1993 Bicycle Guide article, Mountain Bikes: Who Needs Them?, which argued that (w/technique and technical skill) one could ride a road bike off road.

Kostman in 1993

Several months ago, Kostman wrote me suggesting that Archival Clothing offer a musette in a size that would accommodate a 14″ mac laptop. He uses his own simple cotton Kucharik musettes to carry his laptop and sundry items. Although I couldn’t provide Chris with an archival musette that met his size specifications, I persuaded him to purchase one of our flap musettes for his trip to India and Kashmir

Several weeks later, Chris published the following field test report on his blog, XO-1.org:

“I’m m an absolute bag nut and very picky when it comes to the bags I purchase and utilize – for any purpose. For 95% of my bag needs, I rely on the built-to-last, American-made offerings from Red Oxx in Billings, MT. I literally have ten or more of them in use on a regular basis. When I head off on a roadtrip, or to produce an event, it’s a veritable rolling Red Oxx commercial! There’s more on my Red Oxx bags here on the Community Page on the AdventureCORPS site.

A recent two-week trip through India and Kashmir was “bagged” perfectly with three bags from Red Oxx: the Air Boss to hold all my clothes in a space-efficient, and wrinkle-free, manner; the Mini-Ruck as my airplane carry-on with camera gear, gifts, reading material, food, and more; and a Safari Beanos 5.5 as the “bottomless pit” duffle to hold sleeping bags, ground pads, hydration packs for hiking, extra shoes, and other bulky items not needed on a daily basis by our group of three.

I knew all my real packing, hauling, and storage needs would be handled well by my trip of Red Oxx bags, but I also wanted something something small and inconspicuous as my daily-use bag, especially for my large-size digital camera with extra lens, my Moleskine notebook, and the misc. items I’d want to carry every day such as hand sanitizer, energy bars, business cards, and a bottle of water.

Hopefully all of you know that musette bags began their legendary history in the military, then became de rigeur food-and-drink-hand-off bags in the professional cycling world.

I have used an ultra simple cotton musette by Kucharik for over a decade as a protective sleeve for my Mac laptops. When running to the PO, bank, tea shop, and the like I use the same Kucharik musette to carry small items. When I expect to have to carry a bunch of items on my bike – such as when stopping at my mailbox at the end of a long ride – I will carry the folded up musette in my jersey pocket to put to good use when needed. That particular musette has seen a zillion miles and a quadrillion uses, so I knew something along those lines, except more sturdily made and without any logos, would be perfect for my India and Kashmir trip.


Enter the recently released musette bag from Archival Clothing, a blog business I’ve been following lately. I ordered one just before winging it to a time zone exactly 12.5 hours later than my own. What a wise purchase that proved to be!

I used the Archival Clothing musette bag every day, taking it everywhere I went. It served many duties, including camera bag, shopping bag, and mainly just keeping everything I needed on a daily basis in a handy, low-key, easy-to-use design. The bag slowly changed color over time, taking on a more rugged, and lived-in patina. I don’t plan to clean it any time soon; it keeps getting better looking. No doubt it will last forever, too.

In a few of shots below, you can see everything which I stuffed in it one day during the only “shopping spree” of the trip. That was in Dharamsala (more specifically, MacLeod Ganj), home of the Dalai Lama and many Tibetan refugees. The latter have some neat things for sale, and my two travel friends kept handing me stuff to carry in my musette, as it operated like a black hole into which we dropped everything. To sum up, this is one fantastic bag and I’ll never travel without it. (I’ll put it to good use on my bicycle in the near future, no doubt, and will post a follow-up report about that application as well.)

Kostman along the Lidder River in Pahalgam, Kashmir

Above: You, too, can be blessed by, and photographed with, a spiritual guru for just a buck! (In MacLeod Ganj, India)




Supplemental reading. Mountain Bikes: Who Needs Them?

Columbiaknit T-Shirts Now Available

July 22nd, 2010


Remember our post on Columbiaknit T-shirts? We’re proud to announce that we’re now offering this terrific shirt for sale in four colors. These wonderful tees were designed by our friend Jordan Saylor of Portland’s Winn Perry. They’re made of a stout cotton jersey, with chain-stitched neck tape, cover-stitched collar seam, double needle sewn hem, a lovely rounded pocket, and a perfect fit – slim, not tight. Made in Portland, Oregon by Columbiaknit, a Portland company who has been making sturdy cotton garments since 1921.

Our quantities are EXTREMELY limited – order very soon if you want one. We only have a handful. If you cannot add a size/color combination to your cart, we’re afraid that it is no longer available. If you miss out on this round, don’t fear – we’ll be offering a re-stock of this shirt in a few months (and possibly a long sleeve version, as well – thoughts?).

Archival Webbing Belts

July 17th, 2010


We love our British military-spec webbing, especially since it took us so long to find an example that was up to our standards. The dense, stout weave becomes more supple with use, without ever becoming flimsy. This is a simple ring belt, with nothing more than a length of webbing with two solid brass rings. Our signature red bar-tack keeps things together. Ideal for summer use with denim, chinos, and shorts of all stripes. Made by the same folks who sew our bags in Springfield, OR.

SMALL – fits waists from 29-32
MEDIUM – fits waists from 32-34
LARGE – fits waists from 34-37

Made in USA

Available here in our web shop.

Illustrated use

Prototype for future belt width

Archival Playground and Recreation

July 16th, 2010


By day, I work in a basement with a permaclimate. Colleague Ugg wear and winter tan lines have further confused my seasonal cues. As far as I know, June could be January. I use a campus web cam to check the weather but wish I had something more nautical like a periscope or porthole. Since summer is an offscreen event for me, I’m vicariously enjoying scenes of recreation by way of Playground and Recreation magazine, a municipal parks publication from the 1920s. Here are a few surrogate views of summer for those similarly denied and for those in the summer hemisphere:








Archival Correspondence

July 13th, 2010


QSL cards are used as hard-copy evidence of receiving a fellow wireless radio enthusiast’s signal. Get it? Me neither. There’s a great Wikipedia article on the subject, but I’m just fascinated by the QSL cards. Here are a few from my collection:







Some wireless inspiration:





Here’s a great French site with a few thousand QSLs. My favorites are those from French-occupied North Africa.

Archival Portfolio

July 10th, 2010


The Archival Clothing web shop has finally launched. We’ll be updating and adding to the site over the next weeks. Since we’re a small outfit, some items will be in and out of stock as we work out inventory and production run issues. Our store features new images by William Brinson who was kind enough to photograph our bags for his portfolio. In case you want to restrict readership to the blog, I’m reposting the photos for visual pleasure.






As seen in Design*sponge