Archival Clothing - Made in USA

Archive for October, 2010

Archival Field Trip: NYC/Brooklyn (Pt 1)

October 30th, 2010
Bobby Short portrait at the Cafe Carlyle. Soon after we landed we headed over to the Carlyle for a dinner show featuring OFAM favorite, John Pizzarelli and his wife Jessica Molaskey. Jonathan Schwartz was in the audience. 

Tom, Sara and I breakfasted in Brooklyn with Matthew from the William Brown Project.



Pratt campus. We wanted to see to whence Tom has disappeared.
Visit with Emil and Sandy, the kind and creative gents behind Hickoree’s/The Hill-side.
Some Hill-side wears with Brooklyn view

Exemplary packing station

Sara and Tom inspecting a Stanley & Sons conveyor belt tote
Brooklyn transport


Brook Farm General Store. Our Chaz would enjoy being a shop dog.

In constant transit. Footwear report to follow.

I emailed with this nice gent about places to stay in Brooklyn. We ran into him–by chance–at the restaurant he manages, Marlow & Sons. In addition to serving food, they sell woven towels and Armor-Lux apparel.

The Brooklyn Kitchen. Tom and Sara browsed the pickling supplies. I obsessed over the MKS Design paring knife on the left.

 



We stopped by Epaulet to check out their new Thorogood farm boot and Vanson for Epaulet waxed cotton motorcycle jacket. Lots of foot traffic in the shop.


A few doors down from Epaulet, we made a quick visit to Smith + Butler. Tom checked the fit on a Pointer chore coat. Just out of the frame, a reality TV couple browsed the inventory of nautical scarves, Barbour jackets and American workwear.

An all-important, end of day pause for cured meats at Los Paisanos meat market.

NYC/Brooklyn field trip, part two, coming next week.

Archival Update: A.C. Webbing Belts in Stock

October 30th, 2010



A.C. cotton webbing belts w/new Horween leather tip.

We just took delivery of a new batch of Archival Clothing webbing belts. Our belts are sewn locally for us by the same great folks who produce our bags. This is a simple ring belt, made from a length of 1 inch wide, mil spec webbing with two solid brass rings and a new, Horween leather tip. For the new production run, we’ve added XS and XL sizes.

Archival News: A.C. Plain Musette in the WSJ

October 27th, 2010


In NYC, we were thrilled to see our A.C. plain musette featured in a Saturday article about musettes and man bags in the Wall Street Journal. As someone who subscribes to two daily newspapers, it was great to see Archival Clothing finally featured in a printed hard copy. I bought my copy from a newsstand on Broadway.

Full story here.

Archival NYC field trip report coming soon.

Archival Industry: William Doxford and Sons

October 27th, 2010

by Tom Bonamici
A friend of Archival Clothing pointed me towards this incredible set of images showing the plant of William Doxford and Sons in the late 1950s. Follow the link to get more history on Wm. Doxford, one of the biggest British shipyards of the 20th century. I’m wowed by the scale of the operations here – just look at the size of the lathes!





I’ve done flame cutting, too – on 0.5″ steel. That slab above must be 12″ thick!





Please see Old Town for outfitting before your in-person field trip. Ideally, please schedule your visit between 1955 and 1962. Wm. Doxford was shuttered in 1980.

Archival Progress Report

October 20th, 2010
Shawl collar cardigans (late November delivery)

Archival Clothing web belt with Horween leather tip (next week)

Steele Canvas Basket tote w/revised stencil (next week)

Archival Field Bag (coming soon)

On Thursday, we’re heading out to NYC to see Tom and visit shops in Manhattan and Brooklyn. Tom and I will set aside time to review notes on the waxed jacket sample I just picked up from our sewer in Portland. Here are a few more Archival Clothing projects that will be making their debut in the coming weeks and months.

Next week, we’ll have a restock of Archival Clothing web belts. For this production run, we’ve die cut a lightweight Horween hide for the belt tip. The belt will combine three of our favorite archival materials: Horween leather, mil spec cotton webbing and solid brass hardware.

I just received the first sample of our pure new worsted wool, shawl collar cardigan. Centralia Knitting Mills should deliver our full shipment by mid to late November. Look for the sweater in four colorways: multi-weave gray, cardinal red, navy and light gray. We’ve sized the sweaters for everyone from petite women to semi-sizeable gents. I’ll be sporting my sample during shop visits this weekend.

Terry is busy sewing up new runs of our Archival Clothing Rucksacks and Flap Musettes in all colorways. He will also be working on our first small production run of Archival Clothing Field Bags. I’ll file a separate report on this project closer to the release date.

In the next two weeks, we will be taking delivery of more Steele Canvas Basket totes with a stencil based on a vintage company pattern. Our custom janitor’s tote will probably be available by mid-November.

We’re waiting to see the first samples of our discharge printed, US made, all cotton kerchief. Progress report on this project to be filed shortly.

Check back in the next few weeks for more product pix and updates.

And look for an Archival NYC field trip report next week.

Archival Updates (late October)

October 19th, 2010
Shawl collar cardigans by Centralia Knitting Mill

Archival Clothing web belt (now with Horween leather tip)

Steele Canvas Basket tote and janitor’s bag restock with vintage stencil)

On Thursday, we’re heading out to NYC to see Tom and visit shops in Manhattan and Brooklyn. Tom and I will set aside additional time to review notes on our first waxed jacket sample. Here are a few more Archival Clothing projects that will debut in the coming weeks and months. Next week, we’ll have a restock of Archival Clothing web belts. For this production run, we’ve die cut a lightweight Horween hide for the belt tip thus combining our three favorite material components: leather, webbing and solid brass hardware. I just received the first sample for our shawl collar cardigan. We should have our full delivery of Centralia Knitting Mills in the middle to late November Look for four colorways: multi-weave gray, cardinal red, navy and light gray in sizes for everyone from petite women to larger gents..

Terry is busy sewing up new batches of our Archival Clothing Rucksack and Flap Musettes. He will also be working on our first small production run of Archival Clothing Field Bags.

In the next weeks, we will be taking delivery of more Steele Canvas Basket totes with a new vintage stencil. We’re also waiting to see our first samples our vintage all cotton bandanna.

Check back in next weeks for more pix and updates.

And look for an field trip report from NYC next week.

Archival Trousers – Dickies 1922 Collection

October 19th, 2010



I had wanted to get my hands on a pair of Dickies’ new made-in-the-USA 1922 Collection trousers since I first saw them over at ACL. Eventually the folks at Dickies were kind enough to send a few pairs along for Lesli and me to review.

First off: the quality of construction is beyond just about anything that I’ve ever worn or handled. I’m really impressed. Note the inconspicuous bar-tacking at stress points and the neatly split waistband. All stitches are straight, and the patterning is beautifully done.


All this would be lost if the material weren’t stunning, but thankfully, it’s knock-out. The Cramerton Cloth used in the collection is woven in the US to military spec. It’s thick and supple, and seems to take abuse without noticing. I’m also very fond of the heavy-duty sailcloth used in the pockets, since I’ve had the pockets of otherwise durable trousers give out, usually when I’m carry marbles or ball bearings or coins and riding on public transportation with my arms full. Top marks, Dickies!


A top request for me from trousers, from khakis to denim – stout belt loops. These deliver, sporting bombproof tunnel-style belt loops that are sewn into the waistband at top and bottom. Note neat construction and reinforcement.


So where might I change these trousers? Well, the fit might rub some people the wrong way. I don’t wear my pants too tight – about a Levis 501 fit – but the 1922 collection is sized to historical dimensions, and there’s a lot of room in there. I was initially skeptical, but I’ll admit that they’re very comfortable. Unlike some fits of Bill’s Khakis, these manage to be roomy without feeling balloon-like. I’ve gotten used to how they feel, but I’ll never be entirely at ease in them since they’re so different from anything else in my closet. There’s also a very wide hem on the legs, so if you like to roll your trousers, get ready for a 2.5-inch cuff!


Finally, and I’m nit-picking, the top button of the fly (on the waistband) is too small and incorrectly attached. The button has to go through twice as much fabric at the waistband, which is why denim buttons are larger and have those big posts – the size makes it easier to shove through, and the post provides clearance for all that fabric. The top button on the Dickies is sewn flush to the fabric, so it’s a battle to get through. I simply took it off and re-attached it with a longer “post” of thread – just put a thin skewer under the button while you sew it on. Not a deal-breaker, by any means, and it’s a historical detail to begin with, but that’s the kind of accuracy that I’m happy to leave in the past.


Summary – These are absolutely beautiful trousers, made in the USA to top-notch specification. If the fit works for you, I think they’re some of the best chinos on the market, and for $200, they had better be. The possible shortcomings – wide fit and an imperfect button – come about simply due to historical accuracy. So I encourage Dickies to create an updated version of the 1922 Collection trousers, with a slimmer (read: standard width) fit, lower-profile hem, and brass zipper fly, while keeping the incredible fabric, USA manufacture, and top-notch quality. Here’s hoping that domestic production expands for this venerable company.

Thanks again to Dickies for allowing to test these trousers!

William Doxford and Sons

October 16th, 2010

A friend of Archival Clothing pointed me towards this incredible set of images showing the plant of William Doxford and Sons in the late 1950s. Follow the link to get more history on Wm. Doxford, one of the biggest British shipyards of the 20th century. I’m wowed by the scale of the operations here – just look at the size of the lathes!






I’ve done flame cutting, too – on 0.5″ steel. That slab above must be 12″ thick!





Please see Old Town for outfitting before your in-person field trip. Ideally, please schedule your visit between 1955 and 1962. Wm. Doxford was shuttered in 1980.