Archival Clothing - Made in USA

Archive for April, 2011

Archival Manufacturers: Dickies 1922

April 29th, 2011


I got the chance to preview the Dickies 1922 Fall 2011 line this week. We reviewed the first edition of Dickies 1922 trousers very favorably, saying that our only hitch was the historically accurate fit – a boon to some, but undesirably wide to others. Well, Dickies has answered our prayers in their Fall 2011 1922 Heritage collection. They’ve introduced a Regular fit and a Slim Straight fit trouser while keeping the beautiful Cramerton twill, impeccable construction, and domestic manufacture. I continue to be very impressed with this line.


They’re broadening the line with more shirting, including a knock-out Japanese striped Chambray, and a couple of handsome jackets – all still made in their Uvalde, TX factory.
I had the chance to talk with XXXXXX of Dickies about the development of the 1922 collection. Sounds like most of the patterning was supervised by a certain Mr. Gennaro, who came out of retirement to help out with nailing the historic details.
It was fascinating to look through historic images that XXXXXXX had brought to the showroom. Please send contributions to fund my pilgrimage to the Dickies archive and factory in Texas.


I’m hoping to do a more thorough in-person review of the new pants and shirts; please stay tuned. If we’re pleased with the new models, would anyone want us to carry a selection in our web store?
Finally, please consider buying a pair of limited edition Detroit 874 Work pants – they’re only $50, made in the USA, and for each pair bought, another will be sent to the Salvation Army of Detroit.

Archival Update: AC Rucksack in Navy

April 29th, 2011

Fairfield Textiles, our fabric provider, is now producing their 18 oz waxed filter twill in a true navy blue. It’s a stunner. For our Spring production run of Arcival Rucksacks, we’ve added this new color to the line. An Archival Field Bag in the same navy will be available soon. Our friend Jason at the Wilderness Workshop is the first AC retailer to pick up the new navy rucksasks. You can visit him—and ours bags—on 711 Boylston street in Boston, Mass.

AC Rucksack in waxed navy twill

Available again: AC Rucksack in black waxed twill w/brown Horween leather

Archival Clothing x Columbiaknit Shirts

April 29th, 2011

In addition to Columbiaknit scarves, Archival Clothing is releasing a new line of all cotton, long sleeve and short sleeve shirts. Like our scarves, these crews are made exclusively for Archival by Columbiaknit from dead stock floor fabric. We love our Saint James nautical shirts and were thrilled to be able to produce US amawe love our Saint James french nautical shirts, we wanted to produce a domestic, US made shirt in stripes and solids.

While one of our favorite Portland menswear shops, Winn Perry, has closed, proprietor Jordan Saylor continues to coordinate production run ou

Archival Clothing x Columbiaknit Scarves

April 27th, 2011

In collaboration with Portland based Columbiaknit, Archival Clothing announces the release of a line of 100% cotton scarves. Since 1921, Columbiaknit has been producing best quality knitwear right here in the Pacific Northwest. The scarves were designed for us by our friend, Jordan Saylor of Winn Perry. The fabric for the scarves comes from original, deadstock floor fabrics from Columbiaknit. Made of 8 oz cotton jersey, with turned down, stitched edges bartacked at the corners.

Columbiaknit scarves are available in two colorways:

– Royal / White stripe
– Black/ Gray mock twist

100% cotton
Machine washable

Dimensions: 11″ x 60″

Made in USA

Archival out and back

April 25th, 2011

It has been a happy, hectic spring. Archival operations continue to expand. We’re now shipping out sizeable orders to domestic and international retailers. New bag styles and colorways are in the works. We’re looking for commercial space and planning to bring on a production manager this summer. In the midst of the “blooming, buzzing confusion,” I’m working to qualify for Paris-Brest-Paris – the premier randonneuring event – a 1200k brevet (or bike ride) held every four years in France. I’ve completed my 200, 300 and 400k rides. The 600k remains. Here are a few snaps from last week’s 400k, a loop from Wilsonville to Eugene and back. ST, Archival Clothing’s tab numberer, joined me on the ride.

Archival travel baggage (AC, Filson and vintage Land’s End)

5 a.m. ride start (24+ hours to go)

Kevin, a first year randonneur, and his front loaded touring rig

The only Hill-Side kerchief on the course

Joel and Sara. Early information control

Passing view

Acorn saddlebag. Bill heading towards Sweet Home

Saddlebag adornment. Joel’s Carradice

Lane County. No nukes!

Marcola. David countering the cold with ice cream

Harrisburg. Pause to add supplemental wool layers

North of Albany

Around 1 a.m. Rallying against the chill

Vanilla at the Plaid Pantry in Salem, Oregon

More reasonable transportation at this hour

End is near. Joel on his vintage Jack Taylor

Return to La Quinta. 24 hours and 24 minutes later

Archival Cycling

April 22nd, 2011



It has been a happy, hectic spring. Archival operations continue to expand. We’re now shipping out large orders to domestic and international retailers. New bag styles and colorways are in the works. We’re looking for new commercial space and planning to bring on a new production manager this summer. In the midst of the “blooming buzz and confusion,” I’m working to qualify for Paris-Brest-Paris, a 1400k brevet (or bike ride) held every four years in France. I’ve completed my 200, 300 and 400k rides. The 600k remains. For review, here are a few snap view from last week’s 400k. ST, Archival clothing’s tab numbering hammerer hand, joined me on the ride.

Archival travel baggage (AC, Filson and vintage Lands End)

5 a.m. ride start (24+ hours to go)

Kevin, a first year rando, and his front loaded touring rig

Sublimity pause. Holden in is safety orange booties and helmet cover

Only selvedge kerchief on the course

Joel and Sara. Early information control

Passing view

Vanilla at rest
Heading towards Sweet Home

Schlitz patch on Joel’s Carradice

Entering Lane county. Nuclear free zone

Marcola. David countering the cold with ice cream

Harrisburg. Liquor boxes have displaced public restroom access

Rolling through Albany

Around 1 a.m. Rallying against the chill

Vanilla at the Plaid Pantry in Salem, Oregon

Clerk’s car

End is near. Joel Metz on his vintage Jack Taylor

Eternal return. 25 hours and 25 minutes later





Chester Wallace x Archival Clothing Totes

April 20th, 2011

Archival Clothing proudly sells Chester Wallace totes by friend and fellow Oregonian, Patrick Long. This Spring, we asked Patrick to make up two special bags for Archival: a “wash me” and a “wax me” model. The wash me tote is made from unwaxed, natural canvas duck and utilizes Archival’s own best quality, UK made, military spec cotton webbing (the same webbing we use for our AC belt). The wax me tote is an all waxed cotton variation on the traditional Chester Wallace tote. We’ve replaced the acrylic-coated woven polyester bottom with waxed cotton canvas from Fairfield Textiles.



The natural canvas duck Chester Wallace tote [above] is made with Archival Clothing’s own military spec, all cotton webbing. This is bag style is washable.

Our second Chester Wallace tote is made from stout, closely woven, all wax cotton canvas fabric. The limited edition classic red fabric, referred to as “old glory” by Fairfield textiles, our supplier, is the same that we use for our AC plain musette. Inventory for this fabric has been exhausted.

Archival Update: A.C. Field Bag in Black

April 14th, 2011
Recto

Verso

This week, we’re releasing a new AC Field Bag in 22 oz waxed black twill with best quality Horween chromexcel leather. While it’s customary to offer an all black bag w/black leather, we like how the brown leather pops against the black waxed twill. Now available via the AC web shop.

ST continues to number our bags by hand

Morejohn, artist and AC shipping clerk, documents the production process

Our Horween leather gusset panels are die cut locally in Eugene, Oregon

Uncomplicated pocketing, Riri zip, signature bartacking

Shopping from the Present: Alpine Pullovers

April 12th, 2011


I’m probably the only one shopping for heavy duty knitwear. But here I am in April obsessing over the new Dachstein boiled wool pullovers on offer from Bradley Alpinist. The sweaters are made in the Dachstein Region of Austria of wind and water resistant boiled wool. I’ve been sporting Dachstein-style wool mitts by Ortovox for cycling. In wet or snowy conditions, the boiled wool absorbs water and still keeps you warm.

Although Dachstein does not offer an XS pullover, I’m negotiating to test a sweater that was delivered with abnormally small dimensions. Report to follow.


Even in the late 70s, Dachstein sweaters were difficult to source.

Shopping from 1979. Dachstein pullover on offer via Yak Works catalog (courtesy AC reader Allen).