Archival Clothing - Made in USA

Archive for June, 2017

In a bag rut? Buy a Brady Nevis!

June 20th, 2017

Scouting Rakuten, I spotted this curious looking Brady Nevis backpack (which reminds me a bit of something a character from 400 Blows would carry). My house is filled with Rubbermaid bins of bags (Archival, Brady, Filson, Hunting World, Bertram Mann, Zo, Domke, etc.). I don’t need a single new bag – and yet – I am always open to curious mashups of stock bag styles (Rucksack meets a messenger bag, the movie!).  Brady bags are never cheap and there are quite a few classic models that I’m hoping to aquire (the Gelderburn and MacLaren to name a few). However, I’m tempted to save up and nab a Nevis before they disappear from the market. This model appears to be one of those frustrating, Japan only iterations: available via a few web shops and than slated to taunt you as “product unavailable” when you launch your Google search – a few years too late.

 

Trot Moc – the back to nature shoe

June 12th, 2017

It’s great to see heritage footwear brands like Thorogood motoring forward with new models and vintage reissues.

Fun fact: Weinbrenner/Thorogood  made boots for CC Filson in the 1990s. And when Archival started, we met with Thorogood to discuss a possible collaboration. That project never materialized, but here’s a variation on an oxford I wish we had released:

Andrea Cesari, sewing savant and pattern historian, unearthed info on another US footwear company lost to time: Trot Moc. Trot Mocs were made by the Ashby Crawford Company of Marlborough, Mass, whose ads pitch the shoes to men, women, and children in the pages of mainstream publications like Saturday Evening PostOutside and Ladies Home Journal in the 1910s. Like all our fave heritage footwear examples, Trot Mocs were handsewn, goodyear welted, and made from “tough and long wearing” tanned leather.

Since visuals of Trot Mocs are limited to a few scarce catalogs and scratchy, microfilmed magazine reprints, here is a verbal description of Trot Mocs: “The toe is plain, without cap or stiffening, and since the shoe is made on Blucher lines, a perfect adjustment can be made by lacing. The soles and heels are fitted with steel grippers which are rivetted through so they cannot hurt the foot. The shoe is unlined.”

In the absence of Nike and New Balance, Ashby Crawford marketed Trot Mocs as everyday wear, perfect for sport, play, and vacation (in ads, the shoe is billed as the “national play shoe” and the “back to nature shoe”).

But here’s what I love most about Trot Mocs: each pair came with a cast metal stick pin:

 

 

Camping in the old style

June 5th, 2017

Bored by #vanlife? Want an outdoor adventure that doesn’t require Instagram documentation? Love the period costume parade of L’Eroica but don’t own a bicycle? Go to your local bookstore and buy a copy of David Wescott’s book, Camping in the Old Style. Wescott will teach you the basic skills needed for setting up a camp in the “old style” (minus the aid of modern tech, synthetic fabrics, fancy fuels, cellphone connectivity, and global positioning). You will learn how to pitch a tent, build a campfire, organize a camp kitchen, preserve foods, and handle an ax (among other tools). For period specific outfits, and general sartorial tips for camp. I recommend browsing either one or both of these vintage photo albums:  Camping Album (1937) and Sawtooth Mountain Pack Trip  (1947).