Archival Clothing - Made in USA

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Handy Bag is coming in July!

July 4th, 2019

Handy Bag will release its first cycling-type musette in July.

Our first Handy bag batch is in production at T & J Custom Sewing in Springfield, Oregon.

Our first model will be the Handy Musette, a simple, functional, cycling-type shoulder bag made from canvas duck, sturdy hardware and cotton webbing.

How do you buy a bag?

We will be holding a pop up show in Eugene, Oregon, at The Barnlight, on Friday, July 12. 

We will also send out an email notice w/online ordering instructions for those who are not located locally.

If you would like to order a bag or be notified when the bags are ready for sale, email me to be added to the mailing list (archivalblogger@gmail.com).

You can also follow us on my Archival Instagram account for more updates and production shots.

Terry Shuck sewing our first run of Handy Musettes

Follow us on my Archival Instagram account for more updates and production shots.

Archival Resolutions – 2015

January 2nd, 2015

-1
1.  Decide that quality matters and pay for it.  In the end, it will save you time and money.

2.  Before you buy, be selective. Scrutinize items for build quality, fit,  finish, functionality and lasting style.   If an item is not perfect, catch and release it.

3. Do more with less. Add a few key pieces to your wardrobe and wear them until they dissolve.

4. Shop from yourself and from thrift shops. Repurpose strategic items from the past.

5. Support apparel companies that manufacture their products in the US. Buy products still proudly made in their traditional country of origin.

6.  Contact manufacturers and let them know what they should offer. If you’re a woman and you love classic heritage styles, ask them to offer their products in your size.

7. Find out what products are manufactured in your region. Visit factories and publish reports.

8.  Wear wool and linen year round. Experiment with summer weight woolens, and heavier linens.

9. Come up with a signature uniform. Wear it once a week.

10. Read historical newspapers and magazines. Learn about lost brands, fashions, and manufacturing traditions.

Restock – Archival Sweatshirts in Navy and Gray

December 31st, 2014

We just restocked our popular Archival Sweatshirt in navy and gray. To place an order, visit the Archival Web Shop. We also have inventory of sweatshirts in black and a special run made from our Archival Ruby Strip fabric.  Archival sweatshirts are also available in special sizing for women.
Wax Vest Wall-30  Wax Vest Wall-32 Wax Vest Wall-33

Archival Migration

July 22nd, 2011

The Archival Clothing blog was started in 2006 as a place to document our longing for bags, clothing and wares that were no longer available (or may never have existed). In 2009, we brought (the first of) our dreams into reality and began manufacturing musettes and rucksacks. Last week, we moved into commercial space in Eugene, Oregon. Now we have a design workshop and a place to stage our growing inventory. Here are a few snaps by friend and photographer Rick Gersbach who dropped by last weekend.

Archival scribbler

Sewing up a sample on our vintage Consew

Operating theater



Archival Clothing x Columbiaknit Scarves

April 27th, 2011

In collaboration with Portland based Columbiaknit, Archival Clothing announces the release of a line of 100% cotton scarves. Since 1921, Columbiaknit has been producing best quality knitwear right here in the Pacific Northwest. The scarves were designed for us by our friend, Jordan Saylor of Winn Perry. The fabric for the scarves comes from original, deadstock floor fabrics from Columbiaknit. Made of 8 oz cotton jersey, with turned down, stitched edges bartacked at the corners.

Columbiaknit scarves are available in two colorways:

– Royal / White stripe
– Black/ Gray mock twist

100% cotton
Machine washable

Dimensions: 11″ x 60″

Made in USA

Archival Update: A.C. Field Bag in Black

April 14th, 2011
Recto

Verso

This week, we’re releasing a new AC Field Bag in 22 oz waxed black twill with best quality Horween chromexcel leather. While it’s customary to offer an all black bag w/black leather, we like how the brown leather pops against the black waxed twill. Now available via the AC web shop.

ST continues to number our bags by hand

Morejohn, artist and AC shipping clerk, documents the production process

Our Horween leather gusset panels are die cut locally in Eugene, Oregon

Uncomplicated pocketing, Riri zip, signature bartacking

Shopping from the Present: Duchess Clothier

February 18th, 2011

Editor’s note: Duchess Clothier, located next to Winn Perry in Portland, Oregon, offers custom and ready to wear clothing. In addition to stock patterns, Duchess can produce custom garments based on vintage patterns or photographs, using fabrics sourced by the customer. While I continue to contemplate the perfect Duchess project, AC friend Tiffany Thorton moved forward with an order for a pair of trousers inspired by a Sears catalog circa 1933. She documented the custom ordering process for Archival.

by Tiffany Thorton

Ready to wear jackets at Duchess

Lookbook

Jacket sample in the shop

A good pair of trousers is hard to find. Elusive fits, unsatisfactory materials and disappointing color selections have frustrated my search for a decent pair of trousers for a long time. Over the past few years, I’ve expended an embarrassing amount of time and energy looking for The Appropriate Trousers. I really wanted something of quality material and construction; trousers that would be comfortable, durable, and dignified. I nearly resigned myself to existing without these dreamt of trousers, until I spotted an Archival Clothing blog post referencing Duchess Clothier.

Original inspiration

I have long admired the cut of certain species of wide-legged men’s trousers from the 1930’s and 1940’s, and I spotted a couple of examples of such things on Duchess’ website. I was very attracted to the idea of having custom made garments that referenced these past styles, especially from a local establishment. I contacted Duchess and asked, a little sheepishly, if they could make trousers for women. Before long, I was headed to Portland, with a photocopied trouser reference from a reprinted 1930’s Sears catalog.

Correspondence

On the day of my appointment, I was greeted by Seyta Selter, one of Duchess’ friendly and knowledgeable founders. Seyta asked if I would like a reproduction of those specific trousers, and seemed as excited by the prospect as I was. We looked through the sample books, focusing on heavy weight wools, and I selected a dark brown herringbone fabric and an anthracite grey flannel (the anthracite flannel later turned out to be unavailable). We discussed fit as I was being measured, and talked about details like wide waist band that could handle a fairly large belt, a zip fly with three functional buttons on the waist band, and cuffs. I had never felt so supported in my sartorial preferences before.

Finished trousers.

Wide waist band with double loops (belt shown for scale)

Wide cuffs

I was really pleased with the first pair of trousers I got, and decided to commission more. I love the fit and form of these trousers. They are my favorite among the garments I have owned. They seem durable and sturdy, and I’m not worried that they’ll incur a lot of wear or weather damage. Wool is known for doing pretty well in most weather conditions, and Duchess has a large sample of wool fabric to select from. However, I wanted to try an experiment. I wanted to see if the trouser pattern that Duchess had constructed for me could be applied to a super heavy weight wool fabric that could be worn in truly awful winter weather conditions.

Heavy melton wool for winter weight trousers

After conducting some research, I decided that 100% wool melton fabric would be an interesting choice. I had a conversation with Ariel, another of the Duchess ladies, about bringing fabric for them to use, and she advised me on the amount of fabric it would take to construct a pair of trousers using my pattern. The next task was to find some. In the interest of supporting local industry, I felt that Pendleton would be a good source to tap for the melton wool fabric. It took a couple of e-mail inquiries to get a phone number for fabric sales, and when I finally made the call, I was pleasantly surprised to be told that the black melton wool I was interested in was on sale, and yes, they could ship it to Eugene. In July, I brought the wool fabric to Seyta, and we finalized a few details. It felt a little strange to be carrying around a bolt of heavy black wool in the summer heat, but any mild public humiliation is worth it; I can’t wait to put these trousers to the test.

Crucial care and feeding instructions

Archival Update (12/6/2010)

December 5th, 2010
Archival Clothing shawl collar sweaters

Our shipment of shawl collar sweaters has arrived. Per earlier reports, these pure new wool sweaters are produced for us by Centralia Knitting Mills on circular knitting machines from the 1930s. For this round, we’re offering four colorways in two weights of wool. Our navy and gray multi-weave sweaters are 4-ply knits; the gray and red sweaters are a slightly lighter 3 ply knit. The buttons for the sweaters come from Centralia’s own vintage deadstock collection. In February, we’ll be restocking in two new multiweaves: a ligh gray and a navy. We’ve also ordered a small run of XXS and XS for female customers (and slim gents) which should be coming soon.

Here are some other project updates from Archival:

Columbiaknit all cotton long sleeved shirts. We’re offering two versions: a crewneck in 7.5 oz fabric (gray or black) and a cross neck in a heavier weight, 9 oz jersey (natural oatmeal).

Plain musette now available in dark oak

Chester Wallace totes in new colorways
AC stockist Winn Perry is offering these custom made Portland wool felt pennants and a small number of Portland Beaver caps by the (recently revived!) Cooperstown Ball Cap Co.

Next Saturday, we’ll be in San Francisco for Showmanship, a holiday pop up staged by the gents at the Durable Goods Concern. If you’re in the Bay Area, please come by and say hello. We’ll be offering a few show specials and exhibiting our new Field Bag.

Archival News: A.C. Plain Musette in the WSJ

October 27th, 2010


In NYC, we were thrilled to see our A.C. plain musette featured in a Saturday article about musettes and man bags in the Wall Street Journal. As someone who subscribes to two daily newspapers, it was great to see Archival Clothing finally featured in a printed hard copy. I bought my copy from a newsstand on Broadway.

Full story here.

Archival NYC field trip report coming soon.

Archival Update: A.C. Ruckack in Olive Twill

September 11th, 2010
Archival Clothing Rucksack in 22 oz waxed olive twill

We now offer our Archival Clothing Rucksack in a nice, deep shade of olive. The waxed filter twill fabric used for all of our rucksacks is woven, dyed and finished by Fairfield Textiles in Bridgeton, New Jersey. In case you missed the original product announcement, here is a summary of the rucksack’s features. Gray, tan and olive rucksacks are now in stock. Black rucksacks will be available at the end of September.


Archival Clothing Rucksack in 22 oz waxed olive twill

If you wish to inspect our rucksacks in person, visit one of the following stockists:

Winn Perry (Portland, Oregon)

Best Made Company (New York)

Benson Outiftters (U.K.)

On Y Va (Switzerland)

Social Outcast (Japan)


You may also order directly from the Archival Clothing web shop.