Archival Clothing - Made in USA

Posts Tagged ‘archival jackets’

Archival Camp Ensemble

May 9th, 2014

Here’s my idea of the perfect summer camp ensemble. All the items are made for women but could easily be sourced in a gent’s version:
Sumercamp

Clockwise from top: Eastland Yarmouth Camp Moc, Tradlands Vacationland Shirt, Tourjours Linen Chambray Shorts, Freeman Rain Jacket.

Add a few Archival accessories for the perfect camp kit  –  Cotton Bucket Hat and Archival Shoulder Tote:

ACCESSORIES

Wishful Shopping – Black’s Anoraks

April 17th, 2013
Thanks to AC friend Spoke Sniffer for directing me to this ebay auction for a rare, unworn, Black’s cotton anorak.  Beware of the But It Now button which will zap $636.00 from your pocket if you dare to press play.  I’m collecting a few snaps from the auction so you can safely admire this classic anorak design once the real thing disappears from view.

From the Archives: Filson Wool Jacket

March 15th, 2013
 
 
 
Thanks to CC Filson for providing me with this archival scan of the original Filson Wool Sports Jacket.  As someone who has worn Filson for twenty years, I can spot a Cruiser, Cape Coat or Packer just by catching a glimpse of a pocket configuration, fabric type or design detail.  In contrast, the Filson Wool Sports Jacket is an enigmatic Filson model which comes from an era in the 1980s when the company was experimenting with a line of leisure, non hunting apparel.  If you spotted this jacket at a thrift store you might not even identifying it as a Filson.  I myself was thrown off by the heathered brown wool, satin lining and leather buttons –  features more characteristic of a department store car coat. 

Archival Field Trip – PDX

February 12th, 2013
  

Over the weekend, I made a quick trip up to Portland to shop for eyewear, catch a film and check in on a few of my favorite shops.  Here are some visual notes from the trip:
New S/S Engineered Garments at Blake
  
Brand obsession – Masunaga eyewear from Japan (via Blink)
Original Archival Flap Musette on tour 
Bike rack Ira Ryan custom porteur
Sugar Cane Brown Beach Jacket

  
  
Shopping for yet another Hario brewing device
Now Playing – Blue Velvet at Cinema 21

From the Archives – Beretta Maremmana Jacket

February 9th, 2013
Complex pocketing champ
  
Rare feature – rear down zipper for ease of movement 

Fine details – internal drip strip, tab collar, internal pocketing
Best quality Duca Visconti di Modrone cotton corduroy
Favorite feature – braces for carrying jacket in warmer temps

I’m a huge fan of Italiana Maremmana style ranching or hunting jackets.  Beretta is the only sportswear company I know still producing this style of garment.  Here’s a jacket from my collection that is no longer in production (Beretta is only making the jacket in Moleskin). Alongside the Filson Upland Jacket and the Barbour Beaufort, the Beretta Maremanna is a masterpiece of pocketing.  The jacket sports hand warmer pockets, buttoned shell pockets, game pockets and a rear carrying pocket.  It even comes with a rear zip-down pocket on the back which can be opened for ease of movement (when the pockets are full of game and shells, I’m assuming). If you have any photographs or original print ads featuring non Beretta made Maremannas, please let me know. I’d love to add more images of this rare garment to my historical archives.

Shopping from Japan – Uncle Sam

November 29th, 2012

Uncle Sam is one of my favorite Japanese web shops.  Though I cannot read Japanese, I frequently visit the site to check out the shop’s style blog.  While I don’t recognize most of the brands on offer, I take inspiration from the shop’s artful presentation of snout to tail, total clothing ensembles.  Someday, I hope to assemble a cleverly layered outfit worthy of Uncle Sam.  My three zones of aspiration include upper body layering, accessories and the key interface of sock, shoe and trouser.  Here are some recent looks that I’m admiring.
 

Backwards cap, kerchief, patched pants, ankle boots and a sock reveal – a look I pledge to try in 2013.
Fearless patchwork
Here, I love how the scarf and bag snap precisely into place.  I cannot imagine this gent ever dropping his bag, removing his cap or unknotting his scarf. 
Shorts for Fall/Winter
When in doubt, wear a vest

  

Classic, heavy duty outer wear – carried forward
Knotted scarf aplomb
 
Bicycle as accessory

 Archival bags by Uncle Sam

Shopping from the USA: Carhartt

October 19th, 2012
When I was 14, the guys at the bike shop where I volunteered insisted that Carhartts were the only pants worth buying at retail price. I biked out to Coastal Farm and Feed in Eugene, dropped $40 on a pair of B01 double-knee pants, and have been a fan ever since. We’ve done a few little posts on the subject, but in general we defer to Mr. Fox, undoubtedly the king of Carhartt in these parts. 



Recently there’s been a little excitement as Carhartt starts to promote the styles still made in the USA. The WSJ had an interesting piece over a year ago, and Michael at ACL recently posted a great article (with, as usual, an entertaining comment thread). 



Carhartt kindly sent over one of their made in USA Active Jacs for me to check out. I love it – super warm and it’s built like a truck. Gotta dig that giant zipper pull. Regular/roomy fit, so you can layer sweaters underneath. $100. Seriously cannot beat that bang for the buck unless you’re buying used. 


Really happy to see the USA-made goods getting pushed, and here’s hoping that more and more of their goods can be brought home as demand increases. I asked a few questions about the USA line, and here are the thoughts of Tony Ambroza, VP of Marketing at Carhartt. I’m most interested in the links between domestic manufacture and the physical design of the artifacts being produced, so I would have loved to hear more about that process – maybe someday I’ll take a field trip to Irvine, KY to see the plant!

1)     What made Carhartt decide to bring the production of these styles back to the USA?
Our Made in the USA line of apparel was created in response to consumer feedback; they told us they wanted to know exactly which products we make and source in the U.S. We were able to shift some product to other manufacturing facilities in order to accommodate production of these popular styles.
2)     What advantages have you found in domestic production?
We never stopped manufacturing in the U.S. since the company’s founding in 1889. In the last 15 years alone, we’ve made more than 57 million units of apparel in our U.S. facilities.  Fortunately the family who founded the business still owns Carhartt outright and understands how the company’s heritage is linked to US manufacturing.  As a consumer focused American work wear manufacturer, serving and protecting hard working people with our products is extremely important to us.  We work to ensure our products are still built to the high standards established by our founder Hamilton Carhartt, while keeping our prices competitive and affordable.  Thanks to our manufacturing approach we are able to maintain US manufacturing without increasing the price for our US styles.
3)     Any drawbacks?
It is difficult to remain competitive in our industry with only domestic production when just 2 percent of clothing bought here is actually manufactured here.  This is why we have chosen a balanced supply chain strategy which includes domestic and outsourced production. It allows us to provide high-quality products at competitive prices. With that said, no brand makes more rugged work wear in the U.S. than Carhartt.
4)      Has it been easy or hard to find the needed skilled labor to produce at scale in the USA?
Fortunately, many of the employees who stitch together our products by hand have been with us for several decades or more.  The work is physically demanding.  It takes a great deal of training and time for employees to learn the skills required to build Carhartt to our exact specifications.  

New Release: Archival Plain Waxed Jacket

February 7th, 2012


Our first piece of outerwear, the Archival Plain Waxed Jacket is meant to be a reliable, comfortable outer shell to ward off rain and wind. Ideal for walkers, cyclists, fishermen, sailors, and anyone else who loves being outside in all weather. The Plain Waxed Jacket is unlined, with raglan sleeves and two welted handwarmer pockets. Cut just below the waist. Made of a waxed cotton/nylon fabric that’s both durable and lightweight. Collar, cuffs, and pockets are lined in soft wool flannel. Cuffs and back adjust with a snap, and a stout two-way brass zipper is backed with a storm flap to keep out the drafts. Fully finished inside and out, using felled seams and twill tape, this jacket is built well to last long. Available in navy.


Fully finished inside and out

Stout, two way brass. zipper backed with a storm flap

Wool flannel lined cuffs, pockets and collar

Review: The Freeman Jacket

January 17th, 2012

The kind folks at Freeman sent us a jacket to try out. They’re based in Seattle, and make the jacket out of their house – an impressive feat, since it’s sewn as professionally as anyone could ask.

It’s made of a two-layer waterproof breathable, which, for those who didn’t memorize Patagonia catalogs as a child, is an outer nylon shell with a laminate underneath – a laminate that’s very fragile and must be lined. The Freeman feels like a Patagonia or Sierra Designs jacket from the late 80s – it’s light, but not so light that it feels insubstantial.

Flapped pockets with logo debossed snaps. This type of spring clasp jingles a bit when it’s unfastened, so if you’re OCD about jingly hardware, keep it snapped!

Nice soft cotton flannel lining which is a joy to wear and is pleasing to behold. Ideal for the “sidewalk socialite,” as Freeman puts it. I don’t know if this would be my first choice for backpacking or skiing due to the cotton lining and lack of pit zips, but that’s no deal breaker.

The fit is outstanding, and that’s the main difference between this jacket and something vintage. I ended up with a size or two too small, but it’s still nice and trim and the hood fits really well. I love the red drawcord and cord locks.

Recommended as a nice, clean, simple rain shell, made in Seattle by a super friendly crew. Classic synthetics don’t come much better than this. Go check ’em out!

Shopping from the Past: Barbour Solway Jacket

December 3rd, 2011
Barbour Solway on cover of 1967/68 catalog (via Thornproof)

I stopped receiving Barbour print catalogs several years ago. Browsing the online web shop, I have a hard time tracking the ever shifting Barbour lines (Beacon, Sporting, Gold Label, Heritage, Lifestyle, Ladies, etc). Favorite styles are disappearing behind new Barbours with printed linings, updated silhouettes and Steve McQueen plotlines. Many of the Barbours made from the original, “thornproof” 8 oz waxed cotton have been discontinued. Missing from the Barbour line for several years is one of my all time favorites, the Solway Zipper Jacket.

In its day, the Solway was one of Barbour’s flagship models. Here’s a nice illustrated summary of the Solway’s principal features which include three outside patch pockets, inside game pocket, wind cuffs and a buckle belt.

The Solway zip was designed as both a shooting and “fowling” jacket. It was quickly adopted for for general country wear.


Per the 1964/65 catalog patter, the Solway is well suited for use in cold, damp conditions: “The quest for the ideal coat is over, invincibly waterproof, able to stand up to endless hours of rain and not let one drop through.” Of all the Barbours, the Solway appears to have inspired the most testimonials. My favorite is the story of the gent whose Solway protected him from an enraged Zebra.

The buckle belt adds a dash of style
In 1961, the Solway zipper jacket had spinoff models including the Solway Smock

Here are a few historic examples of Solway Zipper jackets captured from ebay:





There seems to be a disturbing trend towards having the belt and belt loops removed on Solway jackets. Recent ebay auctions list this as a garment feature. Since this is a signature feature of the Solway, I strongly advise against this practice.


Loopless, beltless Solway Zipper Jackets

ST, in Solway, tramping through the W. 18th wetlands

I missed this special close out sale on Solway jackets via Sierra Trading Post. Ignominious end to a coat that once graced a catalog cover.