Archival Clothing - Made in USA

Posts Tagged ‘archival rucksacks’

Archival Field Trip – San Francisco

May 30th, 2013
 
  
  

  

Rancourt mocs at Taylor Stitch
  Random encounters with Rivendell

 
  

Sound level monitoring

 Mister Self Edge

 Harris tweed castoff

Sushi Boat

From the archives – Bottle Green Rucksack

April 20th, 2012
While we cannot shop from the past we can still recycle materials from our fabric vendor’s archives. For a limited time, we’re featuring Archival Rucksacks made from deadstock bottle green canvas duck. The fabric, over twenty five years old, comes to us from an orphan warehouse stash that was lost to time. It is the same sturdy, high quality duck we source for our stock canvas rucksacks but the material surface of the fabric (like a nice barrel aged spirit) has been slightly mellowed, and transformed, by time.

Archival Rucksack in deadstock bottle green canvas duck

We’re happy to note that due to the popular response to our Archival Rucksacks in bottle green, the fabric manufacturer will be making this shade of green again in their commercial grade fabric. Here’s your chance to secure a bag made from the original source material.

Archival Visit – HUGE magazine

February 24th, 2012

Last weekend we were honored with a visit from the Japanese “hi-style” magazine HUGE. HUGE is doing a feature on Oregon manufacturers and we were pleased that they included Archival in their itinerary. On Sunday, the HUGE team visited our sewing contractor’s facility in Springfield to get some live action snaps of Terry at work.

It was a pleasure to watch Nick, a professional photographer, at work. Here he is taking light meter readings before shooting Terry. I love that Nick shoots on film.

Nick and Takuhito, delightful gents

Documenting how Terry sets washers and snaps.


Checking Polaroids of me. I’m posing in front of a Quonset hut.

I endorse Takuhito’s twin pack approach to rucksack portage. Nicole, AC Production Manager, dodging the camera in background.

Archival heirlooms: Mamiya 645, Domke canvas camera bag and Kodak 120 Portra film.

Nick’s back up rig – an Olympus Stylus point and shoot. I like his Makr carry pouch.

Prepping Rucksacks for their close ups

Archival Restock: Canvas Duck Rucksacks

October 10th, 2011




We just restocked the AC web shop with canvas duck rucksacks. In addition to red, we’re adding dark brown and orange to our colorways. These rucksacks are made of a sturdy 18 ounce #8 cotton duck. Aside from the material change, they are identical to our classic rucksack and are made in our Springfield, Oregon workshop.

For those who have been waiting for us to resupply our inventory of AC waxed twill rucksacks, we now have bags in navy, gray, olive and our ever popular ranger tan.

Archival News: Canvas Duck Rucksacks

July 11th, 2011

While we do love our waxed cotton twill, we’re introducing an unwaxed version of our Archival Rucksack as a more affordable alternative. These rucksacks are made of a sturdy 18 ounce #8 cotton duck, made in the USA. Aside from the material change, these are identical to our classic Rucksack and are made in our Springfield, Oregon workshop.







The new Archival Canvas Duck Rucksacks are available through On Y Va (Zurich), The Tannery (Boston), Goose Barnacle (Brooklyn) and the AC web shop.

Archival Update: Black Rucksacks in Stock

October 6th, 2010



Terry, our local sewer, just delivered a stunning, ebony batch of Archival Clothing rucksacks. For this round of waxed twill bags, we sourced elegant, black Horween aniline chromexcel leather for a modern, monochrome look.* We also modified the strap adjustment system to accommodate a wider size range of users. Since Tom is now operating out of Brooklyn, Sara has taken over the work of stamping each individual rucksack strap keeper. Look for her handiwork as well on our future production run of field bags.

Rucksacks in ranger tan, olive and gray can be purchased from our web shop or via our retailers.

Send email inquiries about our product offerings to info@archivalclothing.com

*Our signature red bar tacking remains.