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Posts Tagged ‘archival summer’

Summer Naturals

July 14th, 2014

 018 Archival Clothing

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This season Archival is featuring bags – the Shoulder Tote, Roll Top and Day Pack –  in natural 18 oz canvas duck and wallets in undyed, vegetable tan leather.  Summer is the perfect time to experiment with unwaxed fabrics and lighter shades of leather.  Rather than worry about getting these things dirty – document how the darken and gain character when exposed to sun, dirt and indigo.

Summer Repose

July 3rd, 2014

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We just released our July Archival newsletter which features summer essentials, new products, a coupon code and a special Archival Rolltop giveaway. To be added to the list for future mailings, email info@archivalclothing.com.   In the meantime, enjoy the holiday break.

Shopping from ebay – Vintage Swimwear

June 24th, 2013

Poolside wool in Coral Gables (via Florida Memory Project)
When I was a student in Seattle, the University pool leased out woolen bathers for day use.  This was 1990.  I’m pretty sure the school stocked their supply from the municipal pool in Buster Keaton’s The Camerman.  If you’re shopping for your very own vintage suit, I advise that you browse the listings on ebay.  A recent search produced many handsome models.  My favorites are those made by the Portland, Oregon based Jantzen swimwear company.  The company’s logo – a swan diving lady – is in desperate need of reissue.
 
Keaton’s bather
Note accessory rubber bathing shoes


  

Archival Rolled Sleeves

June 20th, 2013

I’m not a big fan of summer weight garb.  I much prefer to modify my standard winter wardrobe of woolens and long sleeve cotton shirts for warmer weather  Why buy cotton poplin or linen or gingham for the abbreviated northwest summer (July-August) when you could just roll up your sleeves for the same degree of ventilation.  The Art of Manliness offers this detailed style guide for best practices on rolling your sleeves.  For exemplary examples from the archives, see below:

 
 

Archival Napping

October 9th, 2012
With the advent of Fall, I’m happily adding archival layers to my wardrobe, but I’m also looking back with nostalgia on the warmer, sun weary days of August.  Boston Public Library posted photos of city dwellers from the 1930s napping in public parks – a communal practice that has sadly disappeared in the last seven or so decades.  As someone who shuns tank tops and ostensibly summerweight clothing, I love that most of the nappers, despite the swelter, are fully clothed, wearing long sleeved shirts, long pants and lace up shoes. 

  

 

Archival Field Trip – Ross Lake

August 6th, 2012
Photos by Rick Gersbach

Friend of Archival Rick and I took off last weekend for Ross and Diablo Lakes in Washington’s North Cascades. We spent a blissful three days paddling around, catching some massive bull trout, fighting headwinds, and addressing the issue of bourbon remaining in the bottle. No complaints – we had perfect weather, the scenery was incredible, and the Grumman canoe performed admirably.

Mountain Summer

May 21st, 2012

For those of you working through the summer, I recommend shopping from the Glenbow Museum Archives for surrogate vacation snaps of the Canadian Rockies from the 1920s and 1930s. If you’re too pressed for time, here is my summary of an ideal summer spent hiking, reading, rowing, dining, fishing, swimming and climbing – in perfect archival attire.





Summer Synthetic Exceptions: Chacos

May 30th, 2011

At Myakka State Park, Florida, 2004
We’re dedicated to natural fibers, but every now and again we’ll allow a synthetic exception. The Patagonia Retro-X vest is one of my favorites, ideal for backpacking and casual cycling. However, the longest-lived synthetic exception in my wardrobe is the Chaco Z-1.
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Somewhere on the Oregon coast, 2002
I know the sandal-haters will have a fit, but for summer hiking, fishing, scrambling, gardening, biking, picnicking, etc, the Chaco cannot be beat. I love my old Quoddy moccasins, but they can’t go from soaked to dry in 10 minutes…

Working on the Jeffers Brook privy, 2005

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I bought my first pair of Chacos when I was 13, way back when they were still made in the USA. They were re-soled twice and were my only footwear for a month in Morocco, performing admirably hiking in the Rif and cruising through the Casbah. After 12 years of loyal service, they vanished off of a commune’s front porch. I’ve since replaced them with a new pair (now made in China).
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Hiking above Chefchaouen, Morocco, 2009
Most Chaco offerings are horrendously ugly, so I recommend sticking to the Z/1 in black.