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Posts Tagged ‘bicycles’

Wishful Shopping – Rene Herse Randonneuse

February 14th, 2013

While I don’t need another bicycle I’ve been air shopping for Alex Singers and Rene Herse randonnee frames via ebay. Here’s a beautiful 1975 randonneuring bike from the Rene Herse workshop.  If you’re a pure road cyclist and you’ve never seen a Rene Herse, check out all the bike’s unique, rando specific features: custom front rack, integrated lighting system, polished mafac racer brakes, full metal fenders, maxicar hubs, etc.  In the event of a zombie apocalypse, a Rene Herse randonnee would make the perfect getaway rig. 

  

If you’re interested in reading a history of the Rene Herse workshop, check out this handsome new tome by Compass Press.

Shopping from ebay – Jack Taylor Tourist

July 6th, 2012

I’ve admired handbuilt, all steel, Jack Taylor bicycles for years. Fellow Oregon Randonneur Joel Metz rides a stunning yellow JT and friend Jack Fortune owns the prettiest bicycle in my flickr photostream. If you live in the UK, here’s a chance to bid on your own Jack Taylor – a handsome, fully outfitted touring machine from 1968.














From the archives – Nancy Neiman

May 7th, 2012
Thanks to flickr contact Paris-Roubaix for posting these photos of Nancy Neiman, the U.S. National Cycling Champion in 1953, 1954, 1956 and 1957. Neiman was the first American woman to ride a stage race in Europe. I don’t follow contemporary cycling because the athletic garb and bikes are so alien to me. I much prefer the era of amateur cycling in the 1950s documented in these photographs. I love how Neiman looks like an everyday person (the girl next door!) and her steel track bike resembles something I would ride today.
Here’s a 1957 photograph of Nancy in her U.S. National Champion’s jersey. She’s riding a French Rochet Special bike fitted with a Stronglight cottered steel chainset and Lyotard Marcel Berthet pista platform pedals.



Archival Report: Paris Brest Paris 2011

September 9th, 2011

PBP spectators in Villaines, France

I just got back from the 17th edition of Paris Brest Paris, an ultra distance cycling event held every four years in France. I always say that I record and erase my memory of rides longer than 600k. I can confirm via official records that I successfully covered the 1200k course in a time of 86 hours and 55 minutes. My primary setback was a series of intense drowsy spells that left me convinced that I was pedaling in my sleep, but overall I felt strong.

First night. 1200k to go


Scenic views and slumbering cyclists

During PBP, I did my best take photos of my practiced obsessions: people, bicycles and food. Snaps of the scenic countryside are in short supply. For interested parties, here is visual evidence of my participation in Paris Brest Paris with some fragmentary notations

Maya. Organized first randonneuring events in Japan

Amused Breton bystander

Rando Buddha

Audax England rider (designed the club’s jersey)

Photogenic Bryan on his Box Dog Bikes Pelican (SF Rando pal and AC stockist, Gabe, offscreen)

NC rider on one of the last Coho rando bikes

Duane Wright on his Peugeot fixie

Susan sporting a signature cycling dress at the famous PBP crepe control

Snappy French (?) gent riding a Gilles Berthoud

Riding buddy Jeff on his lovely Boxer Bicycles custom

Swedish pal, Jan-Olov, on his Velo Orange Pass Hunter

PBP Ancien Willi Nevin on his Vanilla custom

Kitty Goursolle, ultradistance cycling legend. We finished the Cascade 1200 together.

Jeff “I’m having the time of my life” Tilden

Bill, Oregon rando pal, at the ride start

Charismatic control worker



Food is one of the great motivators in cycling. On PBP, you can forage from Boulangeries on the course for your primary fuel (for me, pain au chocolat and jambon sandwiches). Jeff’s strawberry tart was a visual highlight of one boulangerie which we liked as much for the free coffee. Fatigue and the need for forward movement often drove us to save time by eating at the official PBP controls. My photos reflect the matter of fact nature of this food.

Start
Halfway
One control from the finish

Jeff’s brevet card (so much suffering to go)

Sample view. Vanilla at rest.

Full PBP 2011 flickr set here.

Archival Salute: Carhartt

August 22nd, 2011


OK, if you want to really learn the Carhartt ropes you should be over at 10engines right now (above image lifted from there). James has an almost worrisomely complete Optic.

Just got a few lovely deadstock lids, see above, from another Carhartt wunderkind, Jason of Wilderness Workshop. Reminded me to put up a couple of my old favorites.
Bequested double-front work pants, new in the 1980s, handed down from one CnT generation to the next. I got ’em for a few years and added quite a few scars and patches. Above: raising frame on an AT privy in 2006 with friend Ira.
One of my favorites. Centennial edition chore coat, blanket-lined. Thrifted a long time ago, in a thrift store far far away.
The fit got baggy in the mid-1990s and then it all went offshore… such a shame. Britches of choice for the lacrosse and hockey frats back in college, for better or worse. Love that sturdy dry duck.

Archival Departure: Paris-Brest-Paris

August 16th, 2011

Tomorrow, I (Lesli) leave for France for Paris-Brest-Paris,”the most famous long-distance randonnée.” During the ride (which covers 12oo kilometers in 90 hours), I will be off the grid and out of communication with Archival readers. In lieu of a live broadcast, I’m providing some placeholder photographs documenting my experience.

Arrival at Brest

On the train

Lining up for the August 21st start (8 p.m.)

Traveling along a road in France

Overnight control in Loudeac

At the finish (August 25th).

Interested parties can track my progress via the Official Paris-Brest-Paris site. The Vanilla and I are registered as US frame number 4641. Eight riders from my club, the Oregon Randonneurs, will be making the trip. After PBP, I will be spending a week in Paris recovering from the ride and shopping from the present.

Archival Night Ride

July 24th, 2011

As prep for the night start of Paris-Brest-Paris, a small group of Oregon Randonneurs decided to do an all-night 200k on Friday. Friends Susan, Theo, Marcello, Bill and I headed out from Hillsboro, Oregon at 9 p.m. for a sub 24 hour brevet. Our route would take us out to Dallas, Oregon (about 65 miles away) and back again in under 9 hours and 55 minutes. After a few hours in the dark, my brain starts rattling around like a ball bearing in a spray paint can. I take photos to keep myself awake and as evidence of my participation. Here a few snaps:

Gearing up

9 p.m. Last bit of light

Temperature dropping. Adding layers

Theo, bravely bare knee’d

Most Oregon towns seem to go to bed by eleven


Refueling in Dallas, Oregon. Around 2 a.m.

Ahearne custom

Miyata 1000

Heading back to Hillsboro

Another pause in Dayton, Oregon. 4 a.m. ish

Mist + dawn

7-11 finish. 9 hours 55 minutes later. Theo says we looked like hobos

Bill arrives

Breakfast reward

Shopping From Frank Leder

January 19th, 2010

by Tom Bonamici

Of course we’re all about shopping from the past, but the magic happens when an opportunity comes around to shop successfully from the present. Somewhere in between Danny, Champion of the World, Lady Chatterley’s Lover and The Rules of the Game, I became entranced with the conflict of the gamekeeper and the poacher.


Ever since it came online, I’ve been totally stuck on Frank Leder’s POACHERS series. He’s really killing it with some of the details in this collection. Check out POACHERS at his splash page, but make sure to get into the archives, too. Hinterland: Fleisch and Hinterland: Vagabund are some of my favorites, but honestly, it’s all good.



There’s so much hunting clothing in the city that it’s refreshing to take inspiration from the poachers, who wear their city clothing in the country. When the apocalypse comes, we’ll no doubt have forgotten our Tin Cloth and Bean Boots at home. So join the Archival Clothing team on the south side of Eugene’s Spencer’s Butte: we’ll be the people bagging deer while clad in tattered tweeds and leaky brogues.

Eugene Tweed Ride 4.26.09

April 27th, 2009










On Sunday, I participated in the second Eugene Tweed ride of 2009 (disclosure: I was not present for Tweed Ride #1 which took place, according to this blog report, in slanting rain). By comparison with the original London Tweed Run, the Eugene version lacked eccentric Brits in matching plus fours and cycling brogues. However, our ride, 15-ish, strong, sported a surprisingly deep range of tweed themed outfits. Several folks even created their own refab knickers from found, thrift store woolens (most notably, this pair of donegal tweed trousers).
There was also an admirable roster of bicycles on the ride including a Kogswell porteur, a pair of Winter customs, a Velo-Orange (mine), Sara’s refurbished Bottecchia, vintage Raleighs and Schwinns, modern-brand uprights and a supporting cast of child bikes and cargo trailers. The optical center of the ride was this custom, wooden trunk-trailer which transported our tea and picnic provisions:



Full flickr set here.

Archival Adventure: North Star 6.11.82

April 21st, 2009









Friend Michael sent me a link to this flickr photoset of an early-1980s North Star Bicycle Tour organized by the Bikecentennial.

Per the notes from the flickr set, the North Star tour traveled in 1982 “from Missoula, MT to Anchorage, AK via a route that was over 3,000 miles (1,400 or so were unpaved) and took 68 days to complete.”

I recommend reading through each image in the flickr set. The photographer provides detailed information about the route, equipment, dining options and travelers met along the way. My favorite caption describes the U.S.S. Titan, the photographer’s trusty Schwinn Paramount which was chromed and retrofit w/touring-specific braze-ons for the trip.

Other vintage bicycle touring trips on flickr by Hammerhead2:
A link to a 1976 Palo Alto catalog from which to purchase clothing and equipment necessary for your own nostalgia bicycle tour:
And a source for your own stars and stripes cycling cap (in wool or cotton).

Randonneurs USA cap (by Walz)