Archival Clothing - Made in USA

Posts Tagged ‘brooks’

Archival Jackets: Brooks Criterion

September 21st, 2011

John Boultbee Criterion jacket (via Brooks of England blog)

I’m excited to hear about Brooks of England’s project to create tailored cycling clothing under the John Boultbee label. As a daily commuter, I’m always looking for ways to merge my cycling and work clothing. Here’s a short video introduction to the new Boultbee Criterion jacket.

Many of the Criterion’s technical features are borrowed from traditional hunting garb. For example, the Criterion comes with integrated carrying straps for t.

The Beretta Maremmana jacket (a traditional Italian hunting jacket) makes use of the same hands free shoulder strap design. The Maremmana, in moleskin or corduroy, would also make for a terrific cycling jacket in cooler weather.


The Criterion features an “action back” to facilitate free upper body movement. This feature can also be found on traditional field and waterfowling jackets like the Red Head or this Filson Upland jacket.

Unlike most heritage brands, Brooks has designed a version of the Criterion jacket for women. As far as a I can tell, the jacket mirrors the version for gents but is sized for women.

The UK has a strong history of producing stylish, beautifully tailored cycling wear like the Criterion. I’m mail ordered the hip lenght, M-45 Zipp jacket. Impatiently awaiting delivery.

Another modern UK alternative for cyclists 0r cyclo-commuters is the unlined Hilltrek double ventile jacket. The jacket can be custom ordered in a single ventile layer for greater breathability. In general, I prefer light, unlined jackets for use on the bicycle.

If you cannot afford the Criterion (1000.00 €), we recommend the Carradice Duxbak waxed rain cape. For slow speed, upright cycling a rain cape provides terrific rain protection while permitting you to wear pretty much any outfit you like underneath.

I’m partial to wearing non integrated cycling clothing on the bike. Most suit jackets or blazers work perfectly well for short distance commutes. Here is a terrific modern example:

Archival Bicycles: Vaughn W. Collection

February 19th, 2009
Raleigh Sport

Raleigh DL-1

Raleigh Sport

Alex Moutlon AM-7

Vaughn W. is my kind of archival collector. I might even have to appoint him as an understudy for the time when my own visual content runs dry. Originally, Vaughn sent me a few photographs of bicycles from his collection (“14 at last count”). Each bicycle is nicely appointed with a default Brooks saddle and a Carradice saddlebag, wire basket or some functional racking system. But Vaughn subsequently distracted me with images and commentary on handmade knives (by an in-the-know master), Stormy Kromer hats, Klepper boats, tube amp stereo equipment, US made galvanized pales and buckets, manual wrist watches, and to boot, stills of a (Filson?) wool cruiser style jacket worn by the Joe Waters characters in episode 45 of The Andy Griffith Show, “The Farmer Takes a wife” (a new source for sartorial screengrabs, I’m certain). More on Vaughn and his guest archive coming soon.



Shopping from The Andy Griffith Show (Episode #45)

Shopping From the NAHBS 08

February 16th, 2008


Since most of the frames at the NAHBS 08 have been well blogged and documented on flickr, I thought I’d note an unexpected, non-bike highlight of the show: the Brooks Barbican messenger bag (only one other tagged photo on flickr). Despite the redundant Brooks brand logo across the front flap, this is one of the nicest, new construction, non field-and-game type waxed cotton bags I’ve ever seen. The Brooks product rep wanted to direct our attention to the patented features of the sam brown style shoulder strap/belt but I was mostly taken by the bag’s heavy waxed cotton construction and twin leather air flow (!) dimples.

Main disappointments: the bag makes use of one of those terrible, sliding leather pads which never quite sit right on the shoulder. Also, it retails for the inexplicable sum of 425.00 usd!

Add it to your shopping cart here.