Archival Clothing - Made in USA

Posts Tagged ‘Caps’

Release – Archival Trail Cap in Tan

November 16th, 2012

We couldn’t find a lightweight waxed cotton baseball cap that was readily available and made in the USA, so we’ve produced one ourselves. Classic five panel design with leather tab back adjustment. Made of a 5.5 ounce waxed cotton/nylon that’s both durable and lightweight. Ideal for all-weather walking, fishing, and hunting. One size fits most. If you have a larger head (sizes 7 3/4 and above), this cap might feel a bit small. Waxed fabric: 80% cotton, 20% nylon Now available in tan and navy


Archival Mug Shots

September 28th, 2012

The Tyne and Wear Archives & Museum has just released a terrific set of mug shots from a 1930s.  According to the TWAM site, the photos come from an identification book originally sourced from a junk shop.  What I love about these photos are the split view poses struck by the disheveled yet handsomely dressed perps.  Adding a touch of high art, several of the secondary views are out of focus or feel gratuitous – like school retake photos showing us the perp’s better half.  Out of context, the mug shots read like casting photos for Fritz Lang’s M or the latest Engineered Garments lookbook.

Examine the cards closely and you’ll see evidence of a downbeat, Raymond Chandleresque portrait of crime and criminal behavior in the 30s (one that feels oblique and victimless).  Targets include a depopulated sphere of clubs, warehouses, offices, and shops.  My favorite M.O. (revealing a full character portrait in a few phrases) can be found on the final mug shot for William Jones (DEAD):  “Shopbreaking.  Uses various method of entry. Works alone.  Plays violin outside public houses. Convicition in America for shooting a man.”

Release – Archival Trail Cap

September 20th, 2012

We couldn’t find a lightweight waxed cotton baseball cap that was readily available and made in the USA, so we’ve produced one ourselves.   Classic five panel design with leather tab back adjustment. Made of a 5.5 ounce waxed cotton/nylon that’s both durable and lightweight. Ideal for all-weather walking, fishing, and hunting.   Available via our Archival web shop.

One size fits most. If you have a larger head (sizes 7 3/4 and above), this cap might feel a bit small.

Made in USA

  Tom modeling summer prototype of the trail cap in a future color – ranger tan

New Additions to AC Web Shop

November 4th, 2011

We’re updating the AC web shop with Fall items from Rising Sun, Leather Head Sports, Saint James and Columbiaknit. Check out our Columbiaknit cotton caps in new colorways. And by popular demand, we’re bringing in a new logo-neutral Cooperstown Ball Cap in our favorite color, navy blue. Stay tuned for updates on more items coming to the AC shop including Individualized shirts and a from-the-archives, machine knit wool scarf.

Rising Sun Outdoor Vest Restock (indigo and new tan canvas duck)

Archival Salute: Carhartt

August 22nd, 2011


OK, if you want to really learn the Carhartt ropes you should be over at 10engines right now (above image lifted from there). James has an almost worrisomely complete Optic.

Just got a few lovely deadstock lids, see above, from another Carhartt wunderkind, Jason of Wilderness Workshop. Reminded me to put up a couple of my old favorites.
Bequested double-front work pants, new in the 1980s, handed down from one CnT generation to the next. I got ’em for a few years and added quite a few scars and patches. Above: raising frame on an AT privy in 2006 with friend Ira.
One of my favorites. Centennial edition chore coat, blanket-lined. Thrifted a long time ago, in a thrift store far far away.
The fit got baggy in the mid-1990s and then it all went offshore… such a shame. Britches of choice for the lacrosse and hockey frats back in college, for better or worse. Love that sturdy dry duck.

Duckbill Review

October 11th, 2010

Original Filson duckbill offerings

A duckbill cap was the first item I ever purchased from CC Filson. A decade ago, you could buy a Filson duckbill cap in tin cloth, shelter cloth, cotton poplin or wool. Filson even offered a short billed model (my personal favorite). The original duckbill version was fitted and came with a leather sweatband. Filson has dropped the wool and poplin models and switched over to a one size fits all model with a cotton sweatband.

I have a small collection of caps that I rotate through the seasons: poplin for summer, tin cloth for fall, wool for winter and shelter cloth cloth for spring. The duckbill cap makes for an ideal cycling cap. The long bill keeps the sun and rain out of your eyes and the low profile, four panel crowd closely hugs the head (making it possible to tuck the hat under a bike helmet).

I’m unclear on the origin of the duckbill style but there may be a military connection. A gent at the Pacific Aviation Museum in Honolulu once mistook mine for a WWII military reissue.

Unlike a baseball cap with a stiffened brim, the pliable, unstructured duckbill takes on an origami shape that makes it ideal for carrying in coat pocket or bag. Perfect for protection during a sudden squall.

A few sample duckbill caps from my archives:

Original Filson duckbill in tin cloth

Filson duckbill in cotton poplin

Filson short duckbill

Filson wool duckbill

Archival Lament: Cooperstown Ball Cap Co.

March 18th, 2010

Cooperstown Ball Cap Co. print catalog covers (1994, 1999)

Sometimes I get so fixated on the past that I forget to mail order from the present. A quick web check on one of my favorite contemporary brands, Cooperstown Ball Cap Co., produced this depressing news:

Regrettably, after twenty-three years of making fine historic replica ball caps, Cooperstown Ball Cap Company has discontinued operations. Commercial, financial and legal difficulties; and the complexity of sewing one-of-a-kind caps in the U.S, make this decision inevitable. We thank all our customers for whom, over the years, we have been pleased to make a true vintage ball cap.

For reference, Cooperstown Ball Cap Co. manufactured custom caps for historical teams and individuals. One could order a cap in any historical style or in any combination of styles, logos or colors. The illustrated Cooperstown catalogs featured examples of nearly every known historical baseball team including company teams, military teams and even a hat from the Eastern Washington Hospital for the Mentally Insane. All caps were handmade from 13 oz. athletic flannel, horsehide leather bands and highest grade peak stiffeners. Whenever possible, caps were sewn on original machines in Cooperstown, NY.

Historical styles that influenced the modern baseball cap

For reference, I’m reprinting a few pages from two of my 1990s era catalogs. At some point, the company moved to an online ordering format. But I always loved the colorful illustrations, hand scripted captions, arcane keycode system and personal notations of these early catalogs.

Until the 1940s, caps lacked stiffening crowns. Most of the cap styles in the Cooperstown catalog were designed to be worn close to the head (a look I prefer to the current trend towards fully stiffened, high crown caps).
Choose your Brooklyn style cap: standard, pinstripe, peak band, cap band, 3 color braid or soutache?

Small sampling of minor league caps
Shopping from A League of Their Own
Each year, Cooperstown reissued newly discovered styles from lesser known or non-professional teams. These were special edition options from 1994.

 

A few special edition and “fictional” team caps including one for the New York Knights

 

International models (I always wanted a Yomoyuri Giants cap)
Regretting that I never mailed out my order for one of the cricket caps (see 1999 cover)

 

New discoveries for 1999
Caps could be ordered in any combination of colors or historical styles
Custom sizing options (I always requested a shallow crown w/a short cut)
Fine print

Branch Rickey, St. Louis AL [1913]