Archival Clothing - Made in USA

Posts Tagged ‘cardigans’

Restock – Archival Zip Cardigan

April 5th, 2013
We have just taken delivery of a small reorder of our Archival Zip Cardigans in Navy and Olive.  Knitted from 4-ply worsted wool on circular knitting machines from the 1930s, the fabric is sturdy, warm, and pill resistant. This historical sweater design features a low rib knit shawl collar, a two-way brass zipper, and knitted cuffs. Double thickness elbows reinforce that wear point without an unsightly external patch. Pocket bags are trimmed with multi-weave wool. 

The fit is trim and athletic – on the slim side of regular.   Sizes available from XS to XL.  

Made for us by our friends at Centralia Knitting Mills

  
   

Shopping from the 1950s: Sporting Goods

March 8th, 2013
 

One of my primary time travel fantasies involves shopping from catalogs from the past.  For my Spring workout wardrobe, I’d love to order sportswear and gym equipment from the pages of these old Athletic Journals from the 1950s.  What I adore about this era of sporting garb is the emphasis on rugged construction, quality materials (virigin wools, pure orlons!), “glove smooth” fit and a tailored look (“neatness and uniformity”).  Even the trampolines, gym mats and megaphones were made from super sturdy materials and promised to last for ages.  Take a look at some of these classic ads and tell me what you would buy now. 

 

Archival Uniform – November Edition

November 19th, 2012

Per Archival Resolution #9, here is the November edition of my Archival uniform. While our resolutions recommend that you come up with a signature uniform that you wear once a week, mine has seen active use on multiple days.  

Archival striped tee women and Centralia multiweave cardigan.  Here, per usual, I follow my own rule of wearing at least two layers on top.  In another month, I might add a kerchief or a fine gauge wool scarf as a neck garnish. 

Engineered Garments Upland Vest.   Inspired by the Japanese, I love to finish my uniform with a vintage Upland style hunting vest (the pocketing doubles as a purse).  Since I’m so small, it’s hard to source an authentic hunting vest that fits properly so I opt for updated versions – sized for women and petite gents – by Rising Sun, Post O’Alls or Engineered Garments.

Red Cloud & Co. Denim.  Howard Gee, the denim guru at Ab Fits, introduced me to Red Cloud premium denim made in mainland China.  The Red Cloud cut is close to a pair LVC Levis 1947, my go to denim on alternative outfit days.

Alden Cape Cod Beefroll Penny Loafer.  Not much visual variation here.  I wear Alden Cape Cod loafers – in black and brown – nearly everyday of the year.  My statement on loafers.

If you have a signature uniform, please post your notes to our Archival Facebook page or send me a note at lesli@archivalclothing.com.  I’d love to repost more visual examples (other than mine) on the AC blog. 

Archival Sale – Fall Knitwear

September 14th, 2012

If you’re looking to restock your knitwear wardrobe for Fall, Archival is offering staple pullovers and cardigans on sale for a limited duration. Check out the Odds & Ends section of the AC web shop as we will be adding more sweaters to the inventory in the next few days.

Archival Update: Stripe Cardigan

December 7th, 2011
Archival Stripe Cardigan

We have a few remaining Archival Stripe Cardigans available from our Fall pre-order. Our Stripe Cardigan is machine knit by our friends at Centralia Knitting Mills using 3-ply worsted wool. The end result is a tight, flat weave that is warm, durable and pill-resistant, with an American sportswear fit.

This historical sweater design features a standard collar and a five button placket. The cardigan is made from a slightly lighter weight, 3 ply wool which makes it more suitable for indoor/outdoor wear.

Centralia Knitting Mills have been knitting sweaters of superb quality since 1939 in Centralia, Washington. The wool used in these sweaters is sourced from New England.

Shawl collar cardigans in multi-weave and solid gray also available.

Archival Shawl Collar Cardigan in gray multi-weave

Archival Pre-Order: Centralia Knitwear

August 12th, 2011

We’re taking pre-orders for our special issue Archival Shooting Sweater and Stripe Cardigan through August 14th. These sweaters will be made to order so if you want one, place your pre-order via the web shop by Sunday. Sweaters will be ready by the end of October. We will continue to stock the Archival Shawl Collar Cardigan in our signature multiweave and solids. If you wish to reserve a specific size, place a pre-order via the AC web shop.

Archival Shooting Sweater (made to order)

Archival Stripe Cardigan (made to order)

Archival Knitwear Update

July 28th, 2011

We’re assembling our knitwear order for the Fall. We will be restocking our pure new wool, shawl collar cardigans. As we have reported before, these cardigans are made for us by Centralia Knitting Mills on circular knitting machines from the 1930s. The sweaters, based on historical patterns, feature updated fits, unique finish details and our signature multiweave colorways.

If you would like to reserve a sweater, you may pre-order now via the Archival web shop.

In the Fall, Archival will also be introducing a new cardigan in a snappy, candy stripe knit, gray with black. The cardigan is made from a slightly lighter weight, 3 ply wool which makes it more suitable for indoor/outdoor wear. Pre-order here.

Candy stripe cardigan

Archival is also considering two additional styles for later November delivery–the cardigan in a lighter gray candy stripe:

and my (Lesli’s) favorite, a traditional shooting sweater:


For our shooting sweater, we have specified melton wool rather than leather pocketing, a brass two-way zip and our unique olive multi-weave (a mix of olive, gray, brown and white yarns).

If you’re interested in pre-ordering any of these styles, please email us at info@archivalclothing.com.

Archival Field Trip: Centralia Knitting Mills

June 22nd, 2010


During the early days of Archival Clothing, I posted photos from my 2007 trip to Centralia Knitting Mills. I was in pursuit of the Skookum “award” sweater which I first saw in the Japanese web shop Explorer (a personal favorite).

Skookum Award sweater in multiweave (Japan)

Last week, Tom and I returned to Centralia to make plans for an Archival Knitwear project. We’re picking up where we left off last Spring when we first proposed to manufacturer an all wool, shawl collar sweater based on historical photographs and patterns. Our meeting was a total success and we’ll update you shortly on what we have in store. One interesting detail: nearly 50% of Centralia’s products are now made for Japanese retailers including Nepenthes, Engineered Garments and a fascinating entity known as Red Gingham.

Most of the knitting machines used by Centralia are nearly eighty years old. Working with Centralia gives Archival Clothing the rare opportunity to produce knitwear as it was made in the past. We plan to take this opportunity to release a number of garments which we could once only order from the pages of our beloved 1947 Montgomery Wards catalog.

Here are some updated photos of the knitting mills with annotations by Tom.

Centralia employee Tom (not the Archival Clothing staffer), mans the lone computer.

Third-generation knit producer.

Vortex of worsted wool.

Trim coming off of the knitting machine.
This employee was using a sixty year old button sewing machine. Ran like a top.


A device that Randy invented in his teens for stripping out selvage threads between knit segments.


Our kind of filing system.

Random weave example – one of our favorites.

Randy’s dad invented the random weave for a Halloween costume.
Swiss knit trim – extra stout and stretchy.

A candy-stripe knit originally done for WWM.

US map of Centralia stockists.

It’ll be close to this….

Archival Cardigan Review

May 1st, 2009
Cardigans are photogenic

Welt pockets & knit cuffs

Contrasting trim?

High buttoning neck (6, 7 or 8 buttons?)

As outerwear (but not bulky)
Machine knit in the U.S.A.
Sleeve sizing is tricky (no balloon arms)
100% Worsted Wool

Color or Grayscale?

Coming soon: Archival Buttons
Addendum:

A letterman style sweater worn by a University of Oregon women’s tennis player from the 1930s.