Archival Clothing - Made in USA

Posts Tagged ‘chore coats’

Catch and Release: Mister Freedom Chore Coats

July 18th, 2018

For gents, there is no shortage of chore coats in fascinating cuts and fabrics. Here are a few of my faves on offer (and on sale) from Mister Freedom (via Self Edge). Also, I need to know: who is this handsome, bearded, deadpan, denim fit model? What memory traces does he carry, having worn so many amazing, high dollar workwear garments over the years? What is his daily (after hours) uniform?

Mister Freedom Belleville – Covert Stripe

Mister Freedom Belleville Jacket – Covert Stripes

Mister Freedom Belleville Jacket

Mister Freedom Conductor Jacket

Patchwork Dreams

July 11th, 2018

I spotted this patchwork chore coat from Tigre Brocante last Fall. Unfortunately, a half year later, the jacket (nicely styled for men and women), has disappeared from the site.  You may not be able to buy this jacket, but you can still mimic the look. Check out Corridor’s Duck Dyed Overshirts (on sale) as a worthy, patch-free alternate. Pair w/Corridor Bucket Hat and Troentorp (mandatory style staple) for a seasonless, timeless, unisex ensemble.

 

Shopping from Japan: Danton Chore Coat

February 25th, 2018

I’m tapped out after a trip to Japan. Nevertheless, I’m saving up my shekels for a new Danton chore coat. Danton, a French brand licensed for distribution in France, offers sturdy, unisex work clothing for men and women in staple fabrics including poplin, cotton, and now, sturdy moleskin. Danton, like Engineered Garments, produces a line of stock styles in a seasonal refresh of heritage fabrics. Find your Danton via Zozotown,  Rakuten, or B-shop (a proxy shopping service like Sutocorp may be required).

Shopping from the US Patent Office – Pruner’s Coat

May 29th, 2016

US1498744-0

 

Ever since UO Digital Arts professor, Craig Hickman, published Apparatus, his clever homage to US Patent Gazette drawings, I’ve been obsessed with browsing the patent archives for long lost product ideas. I’ve amassed a large collection of patent illustrations, primarily focusing on bags, garments and bicycling gear. Here’s a recent, favorite find: a special jacket designed for pruners featuring a “pocket construction for the reception of a pruner’s foldable saw, whereby the saw may be readily placed therin or removed therefrom, the pocket being suitably reinforced to resist wear, and to protect the wearer from contact with the teeth of the saw.”

Given the current chic for axes, knives and hatchets, I’m surprised that a company has not reissued this garment, breaking up the chore coat monotony of hand and chest pockets.  Make mine in gabardine or canvas duck, please!

Shopping from the Present: Universal Works Bakers Jacket

October 26th, 2011

I’m always on the hunt for the perfect chore coat. It’s a style that’s warm, but not heavy, and it looks great. Since I wear chore coats in lieu of a blazer, I prefer French “bleu de travails” over heavy, outdoorsy canvas duck work jackets. Here are my basic requirements for the style: it should be unlined, with 3-4 generously sized patch pockets, button closures, spread collar and a boxy fit. When done well, the chore coat showcases fabrics, best quality notions, historic design details, and good tailoring. Chore coat fans can find examples in any price range from the hickory striped Pointer coat ($75.00) to the Univeral Works Harris Tweed Bakers jacket ($625.00).



Universal Works
, in the best tradition of chore coat design, offers their signature, made in UK Bakers jacket in a range of fabrics. Lark in Vancouver sells a version in tweed while Hickorees offers the same style in “fishbone twill” and red waxed cotton. Contrast stitching, watch fob button holes, discrete insert pockets, a center vent and tailored fit elevate this jacket far beyond its humble origins.

Manufacturing from the Past – Dickies 1922 Preview

May 2nd, 2011



I got the chance to preview the Dickies 1922 Fall 2011 line this week. We reviewed the first edition of Dickies 1922 trousers very favorably, saying that our only hitch was the historically accurate fit – a boon to some, but undesirably wide to others. Well, Dickies has answered our prayers in their Fall 2011 1922 Heritage collection. They’ve introduced a Regular fit and a Slim Straight fit trouser while keeping the beautiful Cramerton twill, impeccable construction, and domestic manufacture. I continue to be very impressed with this line.


They’re broadening the line with more shirting, including a knock-out Japanese striped Chambray, and a couple of handsome jackets – all still made in their Uvalde, TX factory.
I had the chance to talk with a designer at Dickies about the development of the 1922 collection. Sounds like most of the patterning was supervised by a certain Mr. Gennaro, who came out of retirement to help out with nailing the historic details.

It was fascinating to look through historic images in the showroom. Please send contributions to fund my pilgrimage to the Dickies archive and factory in Texas.


I’m hoping to do a more thorough in-person review of the new pants and shirts; please stay tuned. If we’re pleased with the new models, would anyone want us to carry a selection in our web store?
Finally, please consider buying a pair of limited edition Detroit 874 Work pants – they’re only $50, made in the USA, and for each pair bought, another will be sent to the Salvation Army of Detroit.

Archival Field Trip: NYC/Brooklyn (Pt 1)

October 30th, 2010
Bobby Short portrait at the Cafe Carlyle. Soon after we landed we headed over to the Carlyle for a dinner show featuring OFAM favorite, John Pizzarelli and his wife Jessica Molaskey. Jonathan Schwartz was in the audience. 

Tom, Sara and I breakfasted in Brooklyn with Matthew from the William Brown Project.



Pratt campus. We wanted to see to whence Tom has disappeared.
Visit with Emil and Sandy, the kind and creative gents behind Hickoree’s/The Hill-side.
Some Hill-side wears with Brooklyn view

Exemplary packing station

Sara and Tom inspecting a Stanley & Sons conveyor belt tote
Brooklyn transport


Brook Farm General Store. Our Chaz would enjoy being a shop dog.

In constant transit. Footwear report to follow.

I emailed with this nice gent about places to stay in Brooklyn. We ran into him–by chance–at the restaurant he manages, Marlow & Sons. In addition to serving food, they sell woven towels and Armor-Lux apparel.

The Brooklyn Kitchen. Tom and Sara browsed the pickling supplies. I obsessed over the MKS Design paring knife on the left.

 



We stopped by Epaulet to check out their new Thorogood farm boot and Vanson for Epaulet waxed cotton motorcycle jacket. Lots of foot traffic in the shop.


A few doors down from Epaulet, we made a quick visit to Smith + Butler. Tom checked the fit on a Pointer chore coat. Just out of the frame, a reality TV couple browsed the inventory of nautical scarves, Barbour jackets and American workwear.

An all-important, end of day pause for cured meats at Los Paisanos meat market.

NYC/Brooklyn field trip, part two, coming next week.