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Posts Tagged ‘diy’

Archival DIY: Rewaxing a Filson Packer Hat

December 26th, 2011

If you’re looking for a post holiday diversion, here’s a tutorial from Chris at Otter Wax on reproofing your Filson Packer hat. Feel free to apply this technique to other waxed cotton items that have lost their finish in the past year. Otter Wax available here.

Otter Wax is fine for both Filson tin and shelter cloth fabrics

In case you missed it, here’s the original post from Chris on waxing dry canvas sneakers.

Archival DIY: Rewaxing Canvas Sneakers

November 3rd, 2011

AC friend and Otter Wax founder Chris Chase proposed that we put together a series of DIY videos on reproofing canvas products. We wanted to test wax a range of artifacts from dry finish canvas sneakers to an AC flap musette. Unlike traditional fabric waxes, Otter Wax is made from natural materials and is 100% petroleum free. In the video below, Chris demonstrates a method for rewaxing canvas sneakers that doesn’t require a double boiler or heat gun. This is the first in a series of AC x Otter Wax reproofing videos. Start gathering your dry finish canvas goods.

Chris reproofing a pair of Superga canvas sneakers
Post reproofing
Otter Wax. All natural, petroleum free fabric wax.

For interested parties, here’s our original post on reproofing a Filson duckbill cap using Martexin wax.

Shopping from The Field and Forest Handy Book

September 13th, 2010

by Tom Bonamici

I’ve started to get settled here in Brooklyn. Classes are going well, I’ve gotten a job in one of Pratt’s wood shops, and my room, though small, is snug. Of course, I’m still shopping, and as the weather cools I’ve been flipping through one of my favorite books to shop for Autumnal activities.

Both written and illustrated by the formidably awesome Daniel Beard, the Field and Forest Handy Book is essentially a sequel to the American Boy’s Handy Book. I’ve been looking at/reading the latter since I was a very small child, but the former came to me during college, a Christmas gift from a friend who knows me well. So if you’re wondering what to do during your spare moments this fall, please consider these suggestions.

Build a Boat:

Learn how to Pack A Dog:

If staying in swampy territory, consider an Elevated Camp:

Build a simple Straddle-Bug Bridge:

Learn to sew a pair of Moccasins:

(This is a good pattern for beginners) It’s never too early to start work on this winter’s Snow-Shoes:

Archival DIY: Reproofing Waxed Cotton

August 23rd, 2010
Martexin reproofing wax. Operating instructions on the can.

Archival Clothing endorses waxed cotton because it’s a rugged, natural, water resistant fabric that requires only wax reproofing to maintain its finish. Waxed cotton users should know how to reprooof their jackets, hats, and bags. Both Filson and Barbour offer factory reproofing services but we recommend performing the work yourself (at least once). Reproofing waxed cotton is relatively easy and personalizes the care and maintenance of your garment. Even if you live in the desert, you should establish a reproofing schedule for your waxed cotton. Reproofing extends the life of waxed cotton and prevents it from developing the folds and wear lines that often lead to holes.

I do my reproofing in August so I can move the work outdoors.

Basic tools: wax (warmed), water, sponge, blow dryer (or heat gun). If you’re using our 1.5 ounce tin, spoon some wax into a bowl and heat briefly in microwave. Some people recommend using Filson wax, say, with a Filson product, but I’ve switched between several brands of wax treatment (Filson, Barbour and Martinex) with the same results. I will concede that for a full reproofing job on a jacket, the larger tins of Barbour reproofing wax are easier to heat in a double boiler.

Dab off dirt with a moistened sponge. Do not use soaps or detergents.

Use clean sponge to spread warmed reproofing wax thinly on fabric. Short strokes work best.

Reheat surface of item with blow dryer to melt the wax into the fabric.

Reapply wax until it evenly coats the bag.
Restored to original factory finish
I still have wax left so I’m reproofing a couple of my Filson duckbill caps
You’ll be moving back and forth between wax applications and the blow dryer
Don’t expect the wax to glaze evenly over fabric. You’ll need to work it into the surface.


There! You’ve shopped from yourself. These rewaxed hats are better than new. Let the sun help w/the final reproofing. Use a blow dryer again if you find any remaining, unmelted spots of wax. If you’ve overdone it, fear not, daily use and rain will wear down the excess wax.