Archival Clothing - Made in USA

Posts Tagged ‘engineered garments’

Rakuten roundup: recent finds for #ruggedladies

April 30th, 2017

Even when I am in austerity mode, I love to browse Rakuten to see what is on offer for Japanese shoppers. A decade later, I remain fascinated by all the licensed euro brands that show up in small Japanese web shops (Kempel, Danton, Yarmo, Sierra Designs, Brady, to name a few). I cannot think of another place in the world where brands and styles are imported, reimagined, and than sold exclusively to a domestic audience. Fortunately, Rakuten has developed a worldwide shipping service that has opened many webshops to international customers. I tend to browse the new shops for brands and than sift the used clothing sites for bargains. I am always looking for updates on staple items or cues as to how stylish Japanese customers are sporting their garb. Here are so recent finds.

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FWK Engineered Garments lab coat paired with rolled trousers and Parabook loafers. As someone who locked in my high water pant height years ago, I love the Japanese commitment to the extreme ankle exposure and socklessness.

 

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I love Japanese appetite for special white and off white color treatments. You won’t find these Brady bags or Barbour jackets in the US or UK.

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Several fave web shops have reached stasis in they model catalog clothing. The approach applies to men and women and goes something like: knit cap, long chore or lab coat, baggy trousers, socklessness and sneakers, clogs or loafers.

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Interesting twist on the UK Lavenham equestrian jacket. I like the idea that a summer jacket would be designed with a quilt lining. The pockets on the jacket are pitch perfect.

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I’ve seen a number of web shops market kids clothing to women. For me, this proves  that a customer base exists for heritage clothing resized to fit women (without compromising design details or creating separate colorways). I only wish more US apparel companies would adopt this approach (or at least expand the size offerings of the kids lines to include XL and XXL).

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Danton is my new FWK Engineered Garments. I love the round collar, windproof jacket. I already own a few copies and anxiously await a new release in a melton wool or cotton twill.

Archival field trip – (capsule) NYC

January 19th, 2014

Archival is in New York for (capsule) this week.   Nicole and I/Lesli spent the Saturday before the show checking in on a few favorite shopping haunts.  Our best find of the day was a navy duck, Engineered Garments Service Coat (half off at Nepenthes). Winter seems to be the time for sample sales and generous store discounts.  Armor Lux (my staple for stripes) is selling a large batch of made in France, cotton nautical tops for $39/each.   Here are a few low res snaps from our day trip.  More reports to come from (capsule) proper.  The full Archival team of Tom, Lynn, Nicole and Lesli will be assembling tomorrow to set up for the show.

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Archival Field Trip – PDX

February 12th, 2013
  

Over the weekend, I made a quick trip up to Portland to shop for eyewear, catch a film and check in on a few of my favorite shops.  Here are some visual notes from the trip:
New S/S Engineered Garments at Blake
  
Brand obsession – Masunaga eyewear from Japan (via Blink)
Original Archival Flap Musette on tour 
Bike rack Ira Ryan custom porteur
Sugar Cane Brown Beach Jacket

  
  
Shopping for yet another Hario brewing device
Now Playing – Blue Velvet at Cinema 21

Archivel Field Trip – Nepenthes NYC

January 31st, 2013

Last week, Archival dropped in on the Monday eve pop-up shop and Kenzo Minami gallery opening at Nepenthes, one of our favorite NYC shops.  Nepenthes was so packed that we were capsule released into the space in timed intervals.   In line, we bumped into a number of fellow Market Week participants who had also come to demonstrate their Engineered Garments brand fandom.  Here are a few snaps from the event and our follow up shopping expedition.

  

 


Fellow Oregonian – Bob from the Lizard Lounge

FWK Cruiser Jacket
Catch and release gauchos
  
Stunning, all canvas duck anorak

  
Skookum stadium jackets

Rare bird – McNairy Brogues for women
Current crush – Engineered Garments belted Storm Coat..

…expertly styled by Najee of Sir & Madame

Archival Envy – FWK EG Aviator’s Jacket

January 7th, 2013

My wardrobe comes from three places: Archival, thift shops and FWK Engineered Garments.  Since 2010, I’ve been buying carefully selected pieces from Engineered Garments line for women.  I’ve amassed Bedfords in wool and corduroy plus a rotating collection of work shirts in chambray and broadcloth.  Just when I thought I was set with staple pieces for the next decade, FWK released this amazing Aviator’s jacket as part of their Fall 2012 line.

 
 

I shy away from replica, military style jackets – especially those with excess straps, buttons and/or trim.  For civilian use, these features, though eye appealing, interfere with the simple, weather repelling, on-off demands of my daily commute.  As it were, the EG Aviator jacket pares the original military style down to its essential features.   

The jacket is made up of an outer shell of cotton/nylon rip stop fabric with an internal wool liner.   Despite all sandwich of fabrics, the jacket does not feel bulky or limit arm or body mobility.  Nylon ripstop keeps out the Oregon rain while the thin wool lining adds a comforting, chill abating layer. In use, the jacket has an amazingly sporty, body hugging quality.

My two favorite jacket features are the corduroy lined hand warmer pockets (not pictured!) and the knit cuffs trimmed in wool.  

Instead of a full storm flap, the FWK EG jacket comes with a snap front, semi storm flap.  Here, I love the visual bling of these three snaps but the sturdy, two way zipper has a tendency to catch on the flap when I zip up the jacket.

FWK EG is one of the brands that still inspires seasonal lookbook anticipation. Here’s a snap from a Japanese site showing how the jacket could be styled with additional, counterpunctual patterns and layers

Archival Uniform – November Edition

November 19th, 2012

Per Archival Resolution #9, here is the November edition of my Archival uniform. While our resolutions recommend that you come up with a signature uniform that you wear once a week, mine has seen active use on multiple days.  

Archival striped tee women and Centralia multiweave cardigan.  Here, per usual, I follow my own rule of wearing at least two layers on top.  In another month, I might add a kerchief or a fine gauge wool scarf as a neck garnish. 

Engineered Garments Upland Vest.   Inspired by the Japanese, I love to finish my uniform with a vintage Upland style hunting vest (the pocketing doubles as a purse).  Since I’m so small, it’s hard to source an authentic hunting vest that fits properly so I opt for updated versions – sized for women and petite gents – by Rising Sun, Post O’Alls or Engineered Garments.

Red Cloud & Co. Denim.  Howard Gee, the denim guru at Ab Fits, introduced me to Red Cloud premium denim made in mainland China.  The Red Cloud cut is close to a pair LVC Levis 1947, my go to denim on alternative outfit days.

Alden Cape Cod Beefroll Penny Loafer.  Not much visual variation here.  I wear Alden Cape Cod loafers – in black and brown – nearly everyday of the year.  My statement on loafers.

If you have a signature uniform, please post your notes to our Archival Facebook page or send me a note at lesli@archivalclothing.com.  I’d love to repost more visual examples (other than mine) on the AC blog. 

Archival Field Trip – Portland

February 27th, 2012

Snap views from last month’s field trip up to PDX.

Coffee at The Fresh Pot

Pina in 3D – Cinema 21




Print ephemera at the S. Glass household

Jarom at Reveille (great source for Rising Sun & Mister Freedom)


Engineered Garments and Tellason denim at Blake

Made in USA daypack at Levi’s store

Jordan testing fit on my Post O’Alls vestlittle t american baker

Archival Jackets: Brooks Criterion

September 21st, 2011

John Boultbee Criterion jacket (via Brooks of England blog)

I’m excited to hear about Brooks of England’s project to create tailored cycling clothing under the John Boultbee label. As a daily commuter, I’m always looking for ways to merge my cycling and work clothing. Here’s a short video introduction to the new Boultbee Criterion jacket.

Many of the Criterion’s technical features are borrowed from traditional hunting garb. For example, the Criterion comes with integrated carrying straps for t.

The Beretta Maremmana jacket (a traditional Italian hunting jacket) makes use of the same hands free shoulder strap design. The Maremmana, in moleskin or corduroy, would also make for a terrific cycling jacket in cooler weather.


The Criterion features an “action back” to facilitate free upper body movement. This feature can also be found on traditional field and waterfowling jackets like the Red Head or this Filson Upland jacket.

Unlike most heritage brands, Brooks has designed a version of the Criterion jacket for women. As far as a I can tell, the jacket mirrors the version for gents but is sized for women.

The UK has a strong history of producing stylish, beautifully tailored cycling wear like the Criterion. I’m mail ordered the hip lenght, M-45 Zipp jacket. Impatiently awaiting delivery.

Another modern UK alternative for cyclists 0r cyclo-commuters is the unlined Hilltrek double ventile jacket. The jacket can be custom ordered in a single ventile layer for greater breathability. In general, I prefer light, unlined jackets for use on the bicycle.

If you cannot afford the Criterion (1000.00 €), we recommend the Carradice Duxbak waxed rain cape. For slow speed, upright cycling a rain cape provides terrific rain protection while permitting you to wear pretty much any outfit you like underneath.

I’m partial to wearing non integrated cycling clothing on the bike. Most suit jackets or blazers work perfectly well for short distance commutes. Here is a terrific modern example:

Archival Parkas

December 18th, 2010

Since I live in the wet Pacific Northwest, my idea of winter outerwear is a waxed cotton or tin cloth jacket. I’ll add a supplemental wool vest or quilted jacket if temps drop below 40. For readers shopping from ice pack climes, I offer some expedition grade parkas from the past and present.


Shopping from 1965: Eddie Bauer

Everest accessories

(Hold your brands against their original creeds)



Engineered Garments Storm Parkas in cotton ripstop for men and women

Montilay Army Duck Parka (lined in herringbone tweed)

Archival Field Trip: NYC/Brooklyn (Pt 2)

November 11th, 2010

Back in Eugene, I’m fast forwarding through some more snapshots from our recent trip to NYC.

If you live in NYC, you should be watching a movie nearly every night. No excuses. During our trip, we were able to catch a screening of Frederick Wiseman‘s new documentary, Boxing Gym. In a future post, we will review some of the archival workouts found in Wiseman’s film. Our favorite: striking an old truck tire with a sledge hammer. In an “only in NY” moment, our Wiseman evening concluded unexpectedly with an audience Q&A led by an NYU film professor and a professional boxer (“The Polish Punisher”).

I stalked these gents down the street near Freemans Sporting Club. I was curious about the untreated natural duck shoulder bag, assuming it was a special Tokyo-only item. I later found it at J.Crew.

Sunday morning, we dropped by one of my favorite NYC shops, Barbour by Peter Elliot. I know most of the inventory by heart but I was surprised by this new Barbour waxed cotton blazer w/integrated quilt liner.

Tempted by the trim fit of the Barbour Bedale for children

Beautiful pocketing detail on a Barbour x To Ki To jacket





During our visit to Freemans Sporting Club,we ran into these friends of Archival Clothing (Seattle transplants). For obvious reasons, we love Freeman’s ethos of producing locally made, heritage inspired clothing from the best quality materials. The chore jacket in 5.5 oz Waxwear waxed cotton is a personal favorite.

Fellow Oregonian and A Restless Transplant blogger, Foster Huntington, joined our archival walking tour Saturday afternoon.


Quick pause at the J.Crew Liquor Store.





Since we sell our Archival Rucksacks through Peter Buchanan’s Best Made Co, we wanted to stop by his studio and meet Peter in person. We chatted about the genesis of Peter’s axe project and a mystery chore coat he picked up in Sweden. Turns out the jacket is made by Saint James and it’s a model readily available through our own distributor (if you’re interested, email me). Per normal, the size small jacket fits me (and Tom) like David Byrne’s suit in Stop Making Sense. Lensman Foster took some great snaps of the studio visit.



On Sunday, we made a pilgrimage to MOMA to see the Frankfurt kitchen and some time based art.




On Monday, Tom and I finished up our tour of shops. We stopped at Odin, a great NYC menswear shop that carries Engineered Garments, an Archival Clothing favorite. I was impressed by the friendly, low key store staff. They didn’t seem to mind me snapping ten thousand views of my current obsession, a ripstop cotton pea coat by Engineered Garments. During our visit, a delivery gent came by to pick up a package for GQ. I considered slipping an A.C. bag into the bundle.







Friend Jing, aka Hands on with X, recommended that we visit Blue in Green, “a men’s lifestyle store,” which she shops from Australia. Blue in Green specializes in men’s fashion from Japan, England, Italy, France and the United States. Not surprisingly, our favorite items–shirts, denim, and jackets–came from Japan. The Real McCoy rigger boots were total show stoppers.



FWK Engineered Garments for women


New trousers for Tom

Heritage poncho

Nearing heritage overload, our last stop on our tour was the Nepenthes store in the garment district. Tom chatted with one of the staff while I headed to the back area of the shop to view the FWK Engineered Garments collection for women (review to follow).

We picked up a few bagels (consolation biscuits) for our return flight back to Eugene.