Archival Clothing - Made in USA

Posts Tagged ‘field bags’

Shopping from Etsy – Abercrombie & Fitch

April 1st, 2013

Thanks to Jesse Thorn for forwarding along these listings for an Abercrombie & Fitch Game Bag and Travel Kit on Etsy. Although the vintage of these two bags is unknown they were most certainly manufactured by the original, New York based A & F Company.   If you feel the urge to order your own best quality travel bag, here’s a link to our reprint of the 1939 A & F catalog.

Abercrombie & Fitch Co. Travel Bag

Release – Small Field Bags in Canvas Duck

February 26th, 2013
Our Small Field Bag is a scaled-down version of our original Field Bag for those who don’t need to carry as much in the field or to the office. Intended as a daily workhorse, our field bag is a cross between a traditional English fishing bag and an urban messenger bag.  Durable construction and practical features allow the bag to excel at carrying gear both outdoors and to the office.

For Spring we’re releasing this bag in 18 oz cotton duck fabric in natural, navy, charcoal and carmine red.  Like the original Field Bag, the Small Field Bag is trimmed in Horween leather and features solid brass hardware, a YKK zipper and mil spec cotton webbing.  

Available via the Archival Web Shop and select stockists.

Update – Archival Small Field Bags in ranger tan and black

March 30th, 2012

We’re now offering our Archival Small Field Bag in black and ranger tan in addition to gray and dark brown. The Small Field Bag is a scaled-down version of our Original Field Bag for those who don’t need to carry as much in the field or to the office. Intended as a daily workhorse, our field bag is a crossover between a traditional English fishing bag and an urban messenger bag. Durable construction and practical features allow the bag to excel at carrying gear both outdoors and to the office.

Guest Post: Archival Field Bag Review

February 2nd, 2012


Thanks to longtime friend and photographer Rick G. for this review. Rick has an early Field Bag that, we wager, has seen some of the hardest use of any Archival baggage!


As the waterfowl season draws to a close here in Washington State, I thought I would submit a review of the Archival Clothing Field Bag. I have been using this bag all season as a catchall blind bag/jump shooting bag.
It has been a great hunting companion–thorn proof, waterproof, roomy, and quiet. It has seen 28 days in the field this year, and has seen its fair share of accidental dunkings, mud, a whole lot of rain, and more mud. I am pleased to say that the contents of my bag have stayed uniformly dry and clean. An added bonus, the brass ring on the side is a perfect place to clip a game strap.
I initially thought that this bag would be an urban laptop and sketchbook hauler (since it does serve that purpose well), but I soon pressed it into service as a working field bag. It nicely holds all of the necessities for a day afield: a box or two of shot shells, binoculars, extra layers, water bottle, etc…
Recently, an unfortunate, hip high, encounter with a drainage ditch left my bag and I covered with unspeakably smelly mud. After letting it dry out, a stiff brushing and another rainstorm was all it needed to get it cleaned up and looking good.
Can’t ask much more than that.

Typical contents
Detail View

Archival Release: Small Field Bag

January 6th, 2012
Large and small Archival Field Bags

The Small Field Bag is a scaled-down version of our original Field Bag.

Intended as a daily workhorse, the Small Field Bag is a crossover between a traditional English fishing bag and an urban messenger bag. Durable construction and practical features allow the bag to excel at carrying gear both outdoors and to the office.

Features include a roomy main compartment, two bellows pockets, and one large pocket across the back. A solid brass ring provides an easy attachment point for keys or fishing net. Leather strap, roller buckle, and a heavy-duty zipper secure the bag’s contents. Edges are bound in waxed cotton tape, all stress points are bar-tacked or riveted, and each bag is hand-numbered. Fits 13″ laptops.

The Small Field Bag is constructed from best quality materials including waxed twill fabric, Horween leather, YKK zipper, and thread are of US origin. Webbing and most of our brass hardware is sourced from the UK.

Currently available in dark brown and gray waxed twill.

Dimensions: 14″ x 11″ x 3.5″




Shopping From the Past: Carl Denig

November 23rd, 2011

Pim, a friend of Archival Clothing in Germany, recently emailed us a link to a recent upload of a Carl Denig catalog from 1939. Founded in 1912, Carl Denig is the most important outdoor retailer in the Netherlands. Its current offerings are typical REI fare, but have a peep at this catalog. It’s got us longing for hiker’s wall tents, kletter schoen (the first climbing shoes), and sleek alloy teakettles. Sorry for the long post, but this stuff is too good! Many thanks to Jo Hedwig Teeuwisse for the amazing upload.

Shoes on bottom were some of first rock climbing specific footwear.

Those top boots are really something!

Sailing canoes

Nice rumpley bag family.

Aspirational modularity

I desperately want one of those Mikwa Keteltje.

(Note that stripey fabric above? See also)

Shopping from 1939: Abercrombie and Fitch

November 10th, 2011

Here are excerpts from my favorite vintage Abercrombie and Fitch catalog from 1939. During this era, Abercromie & Fitch field jackets and outdoor clothing showed a tailored, British influence. Many of the garments came in dress fabrics like high count cotton poplin or wool gabardine. The catalog contains sections for both men and women. While identified as a high end outdoor clothier, A & F offered practical, stylish clothing that could be worn at camp or for home chores. Many of the garments, especially the denim outfits, could easily be adapted for modern wear.

Should you wish to make a purchase, I’ve reprinted the original order form which should be mailed to the Madison Avenue address post dated 1939.









Shopping From the Past: Banana Republic

October 23rd, 2011

In the 1970s, Banana Republic started out by buying old military surplus clothing and washing, restoring, and selling them. Pretty clever plan, if it’s sold right, and it was done very well indeed – the catalogs felt like a less flowery J. Peterman crossed with a dash of Paul Bowles fanboy. Lots of fun. Eventually, Banana Republic starting buying surplus fabrics and making their own clothes…. one thing led to another and they were bought by the Gap in 1983. The quality held on for a while – Italian-made cotton fleece, English and Italian luggage, and even US-made Ventile safari jackets.

I was paid for a delightful day helping Matt at the Flea with a gorgeous English-made shoulder bag from the spring 1987 collection, found for $5 at a thrift store. Lesli is pretty sure that it was made by Chapman, given the material and webbing clues. Stating the obvious, it’s sad to compare this gorgeous bag with Banana Republic’s current made in China offering:

Here’s the original catalog entry:
Here are more catalog pages for your shopping pleasure, courtesy of the fantastic Abandoned Republic (essential browsing for fans of the early BR). Send your orders to BR in Mill Valley, c.1980-87.

Archival Update: AC Field Bag in Navy

June 10th, 2011


Archival Clothing is pleased to announce that our Field Bag is now available in 22 oz navy waxed twill.

The Archival Field Bag is intended as a daily workhorse, a crossover between a traditional English fishing bag and an urban messenger bag. Durable construction and practical features allow the bag to excel at carrying gear both outdoors and to the office.

See the Archival Web Shop for more details.

Archival Update: A.C. Field Bag in Black

April 14th, 2011
Recto

Verso

This week, we’re releasing a new AC Field Bag in 22 oz waxed black twill with best quality Horween chromexcel leather. While it’s customary to offer an all black bag w/black leather, we like how the brown leather pops against the black waxed twill. Now available via the AC web shop.

ST continues to number our bags by hand

Morejohn, artist and AC shipping clerk, documents the production process

Our Horween leather gusset panels are die cut locally in Eugene, Oregon

Uncomplicated pocketing, Riri zip, signature bartacking