Archival Clothing - Made in USA

Posts Tagged ‘hunting clothing’

Field Coat Nostalgia

July 28th, 2017

In the late ’80s and ’90s, field coats ruled the casual heritage market (before heritage had a name). Affordable, stylish, canvas duck options (heavily pocketed and trimmed in fine wale corduroy) could be found through LL Bean, JCrew, and a slew of lesser known,  hunting supply catalogs (including Cabela’s, which was much less the sprayfoam mall behoumeth it is today). I was always partial to the wool lined Bean model (which merited the “vintage” tag if you inherited one of the earlier, short cut, solid melton wool lined models from you pop).  I ended up with a socialized ’90s edition if the Bean Field Coat which had clearly given up the ghost of pocketing any rusty barn nails or a bloody ducks. Friends in grad school came to the style through the rebadged and semi ubiquitous “barn coats” sold through Jcrew (in mustards and tomato reds). We’re so deep into a denim decade right now that it’s hard to imagine an era when canvas duck ruled as the casual jacket fabric du jour. Could we see its corduroy trimmed return in 2020?

 

Jcrew edition

Special Hunting World model. Wondering who made it?

Guest Post: Archival Field Bag Review

February 2nd, 2012


Thanks to longtime friend and photographer Rick G. for this review. Rick has an early Field Bag that, we wager, has seen some of the hardest use of any Archival baggage!


As the waterfowl season draws to a close here in Washington State, I thought I would submit a review of the Archival Clothing Field Bag. I have been using this bag all season as a catchall blind bag/jump shooting bag.
It has been a great hunting companion–thorn proof, waterproof, roomy, and quiet. It has seen 28 days in the field this year, and has seen its fair share of accidental dunkings, mud, a whole lot of rain, and more mud. I am pleased to say that the contents of my bag have stayed uniformly dry and clean. An added bonus, the brass ring on the side is a perfect place to clip a game strap.
I initially thought that this bag would be an urban laptop and sketchbook hauler (since it does serve that purpose well), but I soon pressed it into service as a working field bag. It nicely holds all of the necessities for a day afield: a box or two of shot shells, binoculars, extra layers, water bottle, etc…
Recently, an unfortunate, hip high, encounter with a drainage ditch left my bag and I covered with unspeakably smelly mud. After letting it dry out, a stiff brushing and another rainstorm was all it needed to get it cleaned up and looking good.
Can’t ask much more than that.

Typical contents
Detail View

Archival Field Trip – Eastern OR

January 19th, 2012

Tromping through the sage. Photo by Rick.

I got to spend a few great days out in eastern Oregon with a longtime friend of Archival. While we didn’t have the most productive hunt, we chose to see it as a scouting trip. After a cold, slow day outside of Hermiston, we went down to the Deschutes and hiked around looking for grouse and chukar. I managed to get a rabbit, and lost a mallard drake to the fast river (bad karma).


A cold morning on Cold Spring Reservoir.



My beloved 1991 Toyota Previa van.



Looking for trouble.



Rick and his beloved Toyota pickup.


Time in camp with Digger. Photo by Rick.

Got into more fruitful duck land a few days later with friend Will. That’s not all my bag, I only got two!
Hopefully I’ll continue the hunting streak back on the East Coast with the William Brown Project.

Archival Reprint: Filson Japan Lookbook

October 13th, 2011

Per yesterday’s entry, I’m reprinting a few of my favorite views from the strangely compelling, Filson Japan lookbook, “The Ballad of Portraits”. I love the stylized presentation of the figures who look like colorized, plasticized transplants from a 19th century daguerreotype (if Dodge Sportsmans appeared in daguerreotypes). Since most web image content disappears from view or gets redistributed away from its original source, I wanted to archive a copy for myself for future reference. It’s a shame we cannot mail away for a print copy.





Archival Jackets: Brooks Criterion

September 21st, 2011

John Boultbee Criterion jacket (via Brooks of England blog)

I’m excited to hear about Brooks of England’s project to create tailored cycling clothing under the John Boultbee label. As a daily commuter, I’m always looking for ways to merge my cycling and work clothing. Here’s a short video introduction to the new Boultbee Criterion jacket.

Many of the Criterion’s technical features are borrowed from traditional hunting garb. For example, the Criterion comes with integrated carrying straps for t.

The Beretta Maremmana jacket (a traditional Italian hunting jacket) makes use of the same hands free shoulder strap design. The Maremmana, in moleskin or corduroy, would also make for a terrific cycling jacket in cooler weather.


The Criterion features an “action back” to facilitate free upper body movement. This feature can also be found on traditional field and waterfowling jackets like the Red Head or this Filson Upland jacket.

Unlike most heritage brands, Brooks has designed a version of the Criterion jacket for women. As far as a I can tell, the jacket mirrors the version for gents but is sized for women.

The UK has a strong history of producing stylish, beautifully tailored cycling wear like the Criterion. I’m mail ordered the hip lenght, M-45 Zipp jacket. Impatiently awaiting delivery.

Another modern UK alternative for cyclists 0r cyclo-commuters is the unlined Hilltrek double ventile jacket. The jacket can be custom ordered in a single ventile layer for greater breathability. In general, I prefer light, unlined jackets for use on the bicycle.

If you cannot afford the Criterion (1000.00 €), we recommend the Carradice Duxbak waxed rain cape. For slow speed, upright cycling a rain cape provides terrific rain protection while permitting you to wear pretty much any outfit you like underneath.

I’m partial to wearing non integrated cycling clothing on the bike. Most suit jackets or blazers work perfectly well for short distance commutes. Here is a terrific modern example:

Weekend rabbit hunting with the William Brown Project

February 11th, 2011

by Tom Bonamici

VIEW FROM THE HOUSE.

Last weekend, I skipped out on the pile of work waiting in the studio and headed upstate with a friend and fellow blogger, Matt of the excellent William Brown Project. It was a quick trip but we fit in plenty of activities and planned plenty more.

DEEP SNOW.
DEEP IN THE BRAMBLE.

NICE HAUL FOR A SLEETING AFTERNOON. WE BAGGED TWO EACH.

RABBIT KIDNEY TOASTS, EATEN JUST 2 HOURS POST-HUNT.
VAST DINNER FOR HUNGRY HUNTERS.
A FINE RESTORING BREAKFAST
INSPECTING OUTBUILDINGS & PLANNING A SAUNA.

HEADED FOR TILLY’S IN MONTICELLO, NY. THEIR BLT WAS RIGHT ON TIME.

Field Report: Rucksack Behind the Blind

January 17th, 2011


AC friend Will recently took his Archival Clothing Rucksack duck hunting in the Willamette Valley. We’re thrilled to see our products in the field – please forward any pictures of bags in use, the harder the better.


Until we’re producing our own Horween game carriers (for slinging dead fowl), please shop from the Brady UK catalog c.1976.

Duckbill Review

October 11th, 2010

Original Filson duckbill offerings

A duckbill cap was the first item I ever purchased from CC Filson. A decade ago, you could buy a Filson duckbill cap in tin cloth, shelter cloth, cotton poplin or wool. Filson even offered a short billed model (my personal favorite). The original duckbill version was fitted and came with a leather sweatband. Filson has dropped the wool and poplin models and switched over to a one size fits all model with a cotton sweatband.

I have a small collection of caps that I rotate through the seasons: poplin for summer, tin cloth for fall, wool for winter and shelter cloth cloth for spring. The duckbill cap makes for an ideal cycling cap. The long bill keeps the sun and rain out of your eyes and the low profile, four panel crowd closely hugs the head (making it possible to tuck the hat under a bike helmet).

I’m unclear on the origin of the duckbill style but there may be a military connection. A gent at the Pacific Aviation Museum in Honolulu once mistook mine for a WWII military reissue.

Unlike a baseball cap with a stiffened brim, the pliable, unstructured duckbill takes on an origami shape that makes it ideal for carrying in coat pocket or bag. Perfect for protection during a sudden squall.

A few sample duckbill caps from my archives:

Original Filson duckbill in tin cloth

Filson duckbill in cotton poplin

Filson short duckbill

Filson wool duckbill

Archival English Cookery

March 31st, 2010


Those of us who cook at Archival Clothing love the classic Time Life series of world cookeries. I’ve cooked out of “The Cooking of Japan” for some time, and am hoping to soon start work on “Terrines, Pates and Galantines.” But I was recently sidelined by “The Cooking of the British Isles,” although I’m less interested in the food than in the context shots. American hunting clothing is wonderful, but there’s still a place for a bespoke tweed shooting suit.


If any butchers read this, please consider reviving the stripey apron: