Archival Clothing - Made in USA

Posts Tagged ‘Rising Sun and Co.’

Outtake – Archival Rucksack

July 22nd, 2014

Thanks to Archival friend and photog Raymond Molinar who sent along this outtake of his Archival Rucksack during a recent shoot for Rising Sun Jeans. I think the bag looks terrific but what I really love is the cotton jacket with knit trim.  Nice snap, Raymond!
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Archival Odds & Ends Sale

February 18th, 2013

  

Check out the Archival Web Shop for our three day Odds & Ends sale.  This is your chance to secure seasonal items, one-off samples and special closeout items.  In many cases, our inventory is limited to a single size or sample so place your order early.  Here are a few items you might want to grab before they disappear from view…
Archival Roll-Top in olive duck
Archival Dopp in brown waxed cotton

Armor Lux Pull Marin
Archival Shawl Collar in navy multiweave
Rising Sun Outdoor Vest
Archival Rucksack in Cobalt canvas duck

Archival Report – ProjectNYC

January 28th, 2013

We had a great time participating in the MADE by Project pop up show in NYC.  This week, I’ll be posting photographs from the event.  Today, I wanted to reprint snaps of three of my favorite Project exhibtors – Rising Sun Jeans, Arn Mercantile and Chippewa Boots.

 Mike Hodis, Rising Sun founder
 Mike’s custom Rising Sun boots (daily drivers)
Brendan in his day 3 layers, Archival knit cap
 
Khue in her belted, heritage ensemble
Tom modeling a new Rising Sun vest style

Me (LL) sporting an indigo plaid waistcoat patterned for women
Project visitor wearing his Rising Sun work apron

Rising Sun Jeans – as finished on the inside as the outside

As a longtime fan of the classic, Chippewa made, LL Bean Engineer boot, I was thrilled to see the relaunch of Chippewa’s new heritage inspired line of boots  Chippewa is now creating a footwear line based on original, historical models from the company archives.  Even the brand packaging and Vibram soles on the new boots are based on an original designs that had to be remanufactured for the brand relaunch.   Per usual, I submitted my request to have Chippewa size the line down so that it could be worn by women or gents with smaller feet. 
  
Neil, co-founder, Arn Mercantile

  


The Archival booth was fortuitously located across the way from Arn Mercantile,  a UK brand that blends traditional, 1920s workwear style with Japanese fabrics and expertly tailoring.  Check out the Arn website to read a terrific interview with Neil in which he discusses Arn’s brand history,  production methods, fit philosophy, etc.  

New Additions to AC Web Shop

November 4th, 2011

We’re updating the AC web shop with Fall items from Rising Sun, Leather Head Sports, Saint James and Columbiaknit. Check out our Columbiaknit cotton caps in new colorways. And by popular demand, we’re bringing in a new logo-neutral Cooperstown Ball Cap in our favorite color, navy blue. Stay tuned for updates on more items coming to the AC shop including Individualized shirts and a from-the-archives, machine knit wool scarf.

Rising Sun Outdoor Vest Restock (indigo and new tan canvas duck)

Archival Update: Rising Sun Outdoor Vest

July 27th, 2011

We’re excited to offer a limited run of one of our favorite Archival finds, the Rising Sun & Co. Outdoor Vest. Made from stout, indigo dyed canvas duck (loomed by Cone Denim), the Outdoor Vest takes its inspiration from traditional hunting and fishing vests.


Heritage inspiration

This best quality, handcrafted garment comes with front patch pockets, a small chest pocket, an inside chest pocket, and an internal “poachers” pocket. Rising Sun & Co., located in Pasadena, California, sews their garments on site — using their prized, single needle, black head Singer sewing machine. Rising Sun has posted some short videos showing the vests being sewn.

Single needle construction

Contrasting cotton lining and breast pocket
Front loading poacher’s pocket

Large patch pockets

Selvage detail on back cinch

Vest ensemble

Shopping from 1958: Montgomery Ward Denim

January 9th, 2011


I’m ambiguous about premium denim. I love brands like Rising Sun, Mister Freedom and Sugar Cane that manufacture jeans using historical patterns, vintage sewing equipment and top quality raw denim. I’m also attracted to denim’s labor intensive care requirements (akin to our own waxed fabrics). But truth be told, I hesitate to pay more than $200.00 for jeans. That’s a price point I reserve for Barbour jackets, Scandinavian knitwear and cold forged bicycle parts.

To save money, I’m shopping from the Montgomery Ward catalog from 1958. I’m looking for Sanforized, vat dyed jeans w/generous, functional pocketing. My preference is for a five pocket model with a high rise and wide, tubular legs. Although Wards offers denim for adults, I’m shopping the “sub-teen” department where clothing is made with extra sturdy materials to better accommodate “rough and tumble outdoor play”.

My favorite pair of denim is on the far right. Check out the front swing pockets and extra large rear pockets. I eagerly await the demise of slim fit denim. Here, that style is reserved for “slim, rangy boys”. Waiting for the day when companies bring back the tubular legs and full seat of Wards traditional “husky” fit (“cut extra full in waist, seat, thighs for top comfort”).

Cutting edge in 1958: plaid cotton flannel lined and water repellent denim. At $2.49, makes for an affordable alternative to the leading competing brand.

At Archival, we design products that will wear until they dissolve. We follow in the tradition of companies like Wards who offer a free pair of jeans if the double knees outwear the pants themselves.


Ladies, I’m sorry to report that there’s not much denim on offer at Wards in 1958. Wool skirts and plaid corduroy pants were the preferred fashions of the day. However, I can recommend a pair of cropped “play pants” in a nice, 9 oz vat dyed denim, “bartacked at points of strain.”

Archival Vests: Rising Sun & Co Outdoor Vest

December 26th, 2010



I first spotted the Rising Sun & Co Outdoor Vest at Man Up last January. John, Howard and Jeremy were all wearing versions of the vest: one in canvas duck and the other in indigo dyed canvas.

John in his Rising Sun & Co vest at Man Up

1952 LL Bean catalog

The Rising Sun vest’s design is inspired by vintage hunting and shooting vests. Traditional fishing vests are cut short so they can be worn into a stream with waders. The addition of an internal game or poacher’s pocket makes them useful for upland game hunting too.

Filson makes its own Original Hunting Vest out of a heavier weight waxed canvas. I’m still waiting for Filson to introduce this garment in their collection for women. As it stands, the vest is cut long and wears more like a shelter tent than a vest. I do love all the strategic internal pocketing (and reinforced wool shoulder panels).

Rising Sun & Co vest available in indigo dyed canvas.



A recent production model in black duck canvas and white herringbone twill.



Since Man Up, I’ve been asking Rising Sun to produce a version of the vest in XS for women. This December, for a larger production run, Mike cut a few higher for a women’s fit. I finally own my own Outdoor Vest. Next to the super short, snug monkey fit, I love the vest’s deep front utility pockets. Most clothing for women skimps on functional pocketing (see recent Barbour Utility jacket for a glaring example). For daily wear, the Rising Sun vest easily carries a large smart phone, pocket camera, notebooks and writing utensils. For revision, I wish Rising Sun would add two rear carrying pockets (per LL Bean vest) and ditch the back cinch. Since the fit on the vest is so snug, the cinch has no real use value. And for me, the cinch shifts the look of the vest from field clothing to western wear.

I’ll be testing the vest for bike commuting later in Spring when the weather permits a formal transfer from wax & wool to canvas duck outerwear.

Archival Field Trip: San Francisco (1/2010)

February 2nd, 2010

by Lesli Larson


Archival Clothing made a quick trip to San Francisco over the weekend to see friends, visit shops, show bags and attend Andrea Marcovicci’s Johnny Mercer tribute. As it were, our visit corresponded with the opening of MAN UP, a menswear pop-up store on Market St. In the next few posts, we’ll document our finds. For now, here’s a quick visual review.