Archival Clothing - Made in USA

Posts Tagged ‘Rivendell’

Archival Field Trip – San Francisco

May 30th, 2013
 
  
  

  

Rancourt mocs at Taylor Stitch
  Random encounters with Rivendell

 
  

Sound level monitoring

 Mister Self Edge

 Harris tweed castoff

Sushi Boat

Archival Guest Appearance

September 3rd, 2012

I love it when Archival customers emerge from the ether to visit our headquarter in Eugene, Oregon. This weekend, Patrick H., a longtime AC reader, dropped by on his way back from a Victoria, BC, to San Francisco bike tour. Patrick first reached out to Archival asking for SF shop recommendations (we have many!). It was great to hear about Patrick’s trip and his work at MEC – the Canadian equivalent of REI. Unsurprisingly, Patrick and I share many mutual obsessions – from lugged steel Rivendell bicycles and Filson field bags to notebooks and fine writing instruments. Documentary evidence of Patrick’s visit below:

Outside Archival headquarters: Patrick on his nicely appointed, Rivendell Sam Hillborne

Skywalker Pez dispenser – a touring talisman

Original Rivendell Baggins Little Joe (a frequent catch and release in my own bag collection).

Mutual bike documentation – Patrick photographing my Velo Orange mixte

Patrick’s small Filson field bag – purchased for a bike tour in Europe

Data exchange – Patrick’s blog

Patrick w/his new Archival Plain Musette

Archival Footwear – Sidi Touring Shoes

January 31st, 2012

AC friend and Rivendell General Manager, John Bennett, sent me photos of his unworn Sidi touring shoes. Unlike modern “carbon” models w/velcro strap adjustments, John’s Sidis come with an old fashioned lacing system and walkable soles. Though these Sidis come from the past, several of my randonneuring friends wore them during this year’s edition of Paris-Brest-Paris. I think they’re stunning enough to wear with cords knickers and a wool pullover to work.






Shopping from the Future: Vanilla Custom Bicycle

January 20th, 2011

In April, I’ll be pre-registering for Paris-Brest-Paris. Although the Pencil was an early front runner, I’ll be riding my custom Vanilla lugged randonnee on the August 2011 ride. Acquiring the Vanilla was a bit like mail ordering from the future. I submitted a deposit in 2006 and took delivery in September 2010. The bike is a bit of a Rivendell remake (more Herzog’s Nosferatu, less Van Sant’s Psycho). I switched over from 650b to 700c tires, requested lighter weight tubing and integrated lights, rack and fenders. Sacha White, the bike’s builder, was kind enough to borrow a mandrel to give my front fork a nice, low radius bend (à la française).

Here’s an out-of-the-past preview courtesy of the Vanilla Workshop’s flickr photostream:

Photographed outside the Vanilla Workshop in Portland, Oregon.

Austere decaling. Only one panel on the seat tube.

Trusty Acorn Rando Boxy bag transplanted to the Vanilla.

Generator driven, Schmidt Edelux Headlight.

Son 20 front 32 hub. Lightweight for year round use.

Leather chain slap guard.

Updated views from an unusually balmy MLK Day ride:

January edition. Bar wrap and saddle have been updated.

Detail shot of simple lugs and Pacenti Paris-Brest crown.

Sacha special: custom handlebar bag rack with decaleur (not pictured).
For interested parties, here’s a short instructional film on PBP.

Archival Bicycles: Brevet Bikes

June 10th, 2010
Chromed Canadian custom by rider/builder Nigel Press

On Friday, I head up to The Dalles, Oregon, to participate in the Oregon Randonneur’s Oregon Blue Mountains 1000k brevet. If all goes well, this will be my last brevet on The Pencil, my trusty Rivendell road bike. In September–or so–I’ll be taking delivery of a custom randonnee frame by Sacha White of Vanilla Bicycles (details to follow).

Since I’m a slow randonneuse, I rarely spend time with other riders or their bikes (save for Pal Peg and her newly built Tony Pereira). I try to grab reference shots at the beginning of brevets or during rest controls. As I’ve already documented, I adore randonneuring bikes for their visual elegance, purpose built design, uber-durability and post-apocalyptic use value. I also love that a brevet bike is visually incomplete without a well made, canvas duck front handlebar bag.

Here are a few of my sample brevet bike snaps.

PBP Ancien, Duane Wright, and his vintage Peugeot

Beautiful custom bike by rider/builder Corey Thomspon
Steve Rex custom at start of SIR 4 Passes 600k

Steve Rex custom front rack

Peg’s Pereira (rare flat repair)

Tournesol after SIR Bremerton 400k

Jack’s vintage 650b Grand Jubile Motobecane

Amy P’s Rivendell Rambouillet (in ghoulish a.m. hotel light)

Tom’s custom Coho

Robin P’s Waterford custom (mark down for minimalist baggage)

Sara’s Velo-Orange Randonneuse (early Johnny Coast prototype)

Trusty Pencil on 3 Capes 300k

Shopping from the past: Rivendell Musettes

May 11th, 2009
1996/97 Rivendell Catalog

Rivendell Acme and Plain Musettes

1994 Bridgestone B.O.B Gazette

B.O.B Basic and Imperial Musettes (my Imperial is 15+ yrs old)

Handling instructions (plus early organic cotton promo)

Rivendell Waxed Cotton “Acme” Musette

And a missed opportunity to mail order a Bridgestone X0-1 or RB-1 from the past:

Archival Review: Cycling Musettes

May 11th, 2009


From my Rivendell musette collection

I’ve been using cycling musettes on and off the bike for over decade. Musettes were originally designed as feed bags for cyclists during road races. If you search for musettes online, you’ll also find references to WWII canvas, military fieldbags (“musette bags”) and other types of pocket-sized canvas shoulder bags.

Foremost, I love the cycling style musette’s low-volume, low profile carrying capacity (a friend refers to them as the essence of purse). A well designed musette should be large enough to carry daily items–cameras, sandwiches, notepads, pencils–but small enough to be rolled up and stowed away inside another bag. I prefer versions made out of lightweight cotton or waxed cotton with minimal hardware or embellishing details. A musette should always be rectangular in shape. I’m on the fence about whether a musette should have a formal clasp or button closure. I’m pretty sure a modern musette should have a fold-over flap.
Rapha offers a modern musette. It’s a little too “updated” for me.

Here’s a classic, vintage style cycling musette by Velo-Retro. Nice, but needs a flap to improve use value.

Gilles Berthoud sells a musette made of the same canvas as his famous Berthoud handlebar bags. However, the Berthoud musette is a bit boxy and I’m not fond of all the contrasting leather trim. I prefer the first generation Berthoud musette (picutred below).

Everybody’s favorite musette seems to be the one sold by Rivendell Bicycle Works during the early days of the company (and in the late days of Bridgestone through the B.O.B. Gazette). The Riv version came in both waxed cotton and untreated cotton canvas (some were made out of Filson fabrics, I believe). The Riv musette had a large main cargo pocket and two front divided pockets. Since the bag was designed for cycling, it came with a secondary sway or waist strap to prevent the bag from shifting during rides (I always removed this strap). I’ll post some catalogue images of the Riv musette tomorrow.

Here are a few more examples of traditional musettes (promo text ads to their appeal):

Traditional string-style shoulder strap (out-of-business bike shop)

Gift addition to my collection (note: simple button closures)

Nice cotton Pinarello with broad strap

I’m working on a design for an Archival Clothing musette. At the moment, I’m investigating successful historical examples and contemplating design decisions: size, hardware (any?), fabric (waxed cotton!), shoulder strap options (string strap or cotton web), button/strap/toggle closure, etc. If you see interesting (vintage!) examples of musettes that please you, forward them along.

For now, here’s a quick visual inventory of bags w/musette-like profiles that interest me:

Original Gilles Berthoud Musette (nice canvas color)
Army Surplus (love the vent holes)

Chapman field bag (single strap closure; game net)

Brady bag (mere most minimal)

Brooks Messenger Bag (steroidal musette)

Hunting World Sling (adjustable web shoulder strap)

Hipposchemes

Interesting blog post on vintage musettes from Hilary Stone.

UPDATE: We’ll be offering our musette for sale in December 2009. See this post for more information.

UPDATE (2012): Archival Plain Musette featured in Bicycling MagazineLink

Archival Review: Cycling Musettes

May 11th, 2009



Classic Rivendell Musettes

I’ve been using cycling musettes on and off the bike for over decade. Musettes were originally designed as feed bags for cyclists during road races. If you search for musettes online, you’ll also find references to WWII canvas, military fieldbags (“musette bags”) and other types of canvas shoulder bags.

Foremost, I love the cycling style musette’s low-volume, low profile carrying capacity. A good musette design should have a purse-like essence without excess hardware or trim. I prefer versions made out of lightweight cotton or waxed cotton that can easily be stowed when not in use. A musette should always be rectangular in shape.
Everybody’s favorite musette seems to be the one sold by Rivendell Bicycle Works during the early days of the company. The Riv version came in both waxed cotton and untreated canvas (some were made out of Filson fabrics, I believe). The Riv musette had a main cargo pocket and two front divided pockets. Since the bag was designed for cycling, it came with a secondary sway or waist strap to prevent the bag from sliding around while riding (I always removed this strap).


Two traditional musettes
Here’s a quick visual inventory of bags w/musette-like profiles:
Barbour Creel Bag (courtesy Reference Library)

Gilles Berthoud Musette
Gas Mask Bag

Chapman field bag

Brady carry-all (strap free)

Archival Knitwear: Rivendell Cycling Sweaters

February 23rd, 2009
Button-up neck (for on-bike temperature regulation)

Rear carrying pocket

Long sleeved version (photographed during mixte test ride at RBW)

Rivendell Bicycle Works used to sell a wonderful derby tweed sweater which they referred to as a long sleeved cycling jersey. The knit sweaters/jerseys were made by the British knitwear firm Outdoor Knitwear/Woolyback. They came in several different styles including a crew neck, a “polo shirt” version and a sleeveless vest. I own the vest and regret not purchasing a long sleeved, crewneck jersey (preferably, the crewneck). The wool for my vest is super durable, never pills, and come in a nice, timeless seafoam green color. Here’s a link to the original blurb from the Rivendell website. Don’t bother the kind folks at Rivendell about available stock. I believe the sweaters sold out several years ago although I have an archival petition in to bring them back (progress pending?). What I like about the Riv jerseys (beyond wool type and generic styling) is how well they integrate cycling or use-specific functionality (a rear carrying pocket and button up neck) into an everyday garment (making it equally appropriate for indoor-outdoor wear).

Wooly Warm garment tag and derby tweed wool close-up

Please email me photos of your Rivendell Wooly Warm sweaters, wool tops or jerseys. I’d like to post a full “catalog” of images of discontinued Wooly Warm woolens.

For interested parties, Rivendell just released issue # 41 of the Rivendell Reader (available for free download as a pdf file).

Archival Review: Randonneuring Season (2008)

December 28th, 2008









Passing views





Bike stalking



Evidence of my participation (first two photos courtesy CecilAnn)











Some central characters



The Pencil

Subject to further experimentation in ’09

Cue sheet in turmoil
Cue sheet on a napkin (courtesy CecilAnn)
Sample nutrition (jojos)

The Pencil and I did not quite make the RUSA 5000k distance award this year. We did complete our first Cascade 1200, survived a few Seattle International Randonneurs death brevets and pedaled through a very drowsy, 24 hour fleche Ouragan (on the same day Eight Belles broke down in the Derby).

Plans for 2009 remain hazy. Most likely, I’ll be heading down to California for the Davis Gold Rush 1200k or staying in the Northwest for the SIR iteration of the Seattle-to-Glacier 1000k (a ride I did two years, on the Oregon side, from Portland to Glacier).

On a localized level, I’ll be focusing on improving my navigational skills (actually monitoring the line-by-line elapse of my cue sheet) and conducting more micro saddle adjustment experiments (I’m in brand limbo between Brooks and Selle An-Atomica w/a Brooks Imperial in consideration).

The Pencil and I remain on good terms despite the fact that its retro, Bicycle Quarterly inspired drivetrain still terrifies me during slow shifts on super steep grades. At some point, in the next year or so, the Pencil may be readied for rando-retirement in a muddy pasture with cyclocross tracks.

Archival confession: I must admit that randonneuring requires the use of some synthetic clothing layers. I try to make use of as much wool as possible–namely jerseys and extremity warmers. But alas, I’m sadly sold on the superior, wind blocking, moisture repelling properties of tech treated plastic fabrics (in the form of jackets, vests and shoes). There is one gent in our club, Drew, who builds his own bicycles, makes his own sports drink, designs his own bike luggage and wears brown leather lace-up dress shoes, full wool outerwear and a cycling helmet that was ANSI certified in the 1970s. He remains a randonneuring hero to me though I know I can no longer follow his dress code on rides longer than 40 miles.