Archival Clothing - Made in USA

Posts Tagged ‘shawl collar sweaters’

Archival Progress Report

October 20th, 2010
Shawl collar cardigans (late November delivery)

Archival Clothing web belt with Horween leather tip (next week)

Steele Canvas Basket tote w/revised stencil (next week)

Archival Field Bag (coming soon)

On Thursday, we’re heading out to NYC to see Tom and visit shops in Manhattan and Brooklyn. Tom and I will set aside time to review notes on the waxed jacket sample I just picked up from our sewer in Portland. Here are a few more Archival Clothing projects that will be making their debut in the coming weeks and months.

Next week, we’ll have a restock of Archival Clothing web belts. For this production run, we’ve die cut a lightweight Horween hide for the belt tip. The belt will combine three of our favorite archival materials: Horween leather, mil spec cotton webbing and solid brass hardware.

I just received the first sample of our pure new worsted wool, shawl collar cardigan. Centralia Knitting Mills should deliver our full shipment by mid to late November. Look for the sweater in four colorways: multi-weave gray, cardinal red, navy and light gray. We’ve sized the sweaters for everyone from petite women to semi-sizeable gents. I’ll be sporting my sample during shop visits this weekend.

Terry is busy sewing up new runs of our Archival Clothing Rucksacks and Flap Musettes in all colorways. He will also be working on our first small production run of Archival Clothing Field Bags. I’ll file a separate report on this project closer to the release date.

In the next two weeks, we will be taking delivery of more Steele Canvas Basket totes with a stencil based on a vintage company pattern. Our custom janitor’s tote will probably be available by mid-November.

We’re waiting to see the first samples of our discharge printed, US made, all cotton kerchief. Progress report on this project to be filed shortly.

Check back in the next few weeks for more product pix and updates.

And look for an Archival NYC field trip report next week.

Archival Field Trip: Centralia Knitting Mills

June 22nd, 2010


During the early days of Archival Clothing, I posted photos from my 2007 trip to Centralia Knitting Mills. I was in pursuit of the Skookum “award” sweater which I first saw in the Japanese web shop Explorer (a personal favorite).

Skookum Award sweater in multiweave (Japan)

Last week, Tom and I returned to Centralia to make plans for an Archival Knitwear project. We’re picking up where we left off last Spring when we first proposed to manufacturer an all wool, shawl collar sweater based on historical photographs and patterns. Our meeting was a total success and we’ll update you shortly on what we have in store. One interesting detail: nearly 50% of Centralia’s products are now made for Japanese retailers including Nepenthes, Engineered Garments and a fascinating entity known as Red Gingham.

Most of the knitting machines used by Centralia are nearly eighty years old. Working with Centralia gives Archival Clothing the rare opportunity to produce knitwear as it was made in the past. We plan to take this opportunity to release a number of garments which we could once only order from the pages of our beloved 1947 Montgomery Wards catalog.

Here are some updated photos of the knitting mills with annotations by Tom.

Centralia employee Tom (not the Archival Clothing staffer), mans the lone computer.

Third-generation knit producer.

Vortex of worsted wool.

Trim coming off of the knitting machine.
This employee was using a sixty year old button sewing machine. Ran like a top.


A device that Randy invented in his teens for stripping out selvage threads between knit segments.


Our kind of filing system.

Random weave example – one of our favorites.

Randy’s dad invented the random weave for a Halloween costume.
Swiss knit trim – extra stout and stretchy.

A candy-stripe knit originally done for WWM.

US map of Centralia stockists.

It’ll be close to this….

Shawl Collar Review

March 26th, 2009

“Durable as Grandma’s Knitting”

Montgomery Ward Winner

I’m moving into the planning phase of my all wool sweater project. Based on blog and email feedback, I’m working on a collaborative design for a shawl collar cardigan. As part of my research, I’m collecting images of model shawl collar styles and sweaters (from image archives, film stills, period print advertisements, online shops). Let me know which version/s you prefer. Also, please email me related web links and favorite sweater examples (living or dead).

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Two historical examples not in consideration:

Coup de Grace (Schlondorff 1976)

Hannah and Her Sisters (Allen 1986)

And in a related note, here’s a sobering post from Chris Bray of BillyKirk on the closure of Baron Woolen Mills of Brigham City, Utah .