Archival Clothing - Made in USA

Posts Tagged ‘shopping from flickr’

Shopping from the past: patchwork denim jacket

May 22nd, 2016

Digital image of original artifact.

Browsing the Minnesota Historical Society flickr stream, I found this fantastic denim chore coat from the 1960s. Metadata from the site identifies the jacket as belonging to Selmer Sauglow, a Norwegian farmer. While I’m a little denim jaded these days, I love the patchwork of this chore jacket which was created by Anna Sauglow, Selmer’s sister.

Featured on the Minnesota Historical Society’s Collections Up Close blog on September 17, 2015

Archival Garb for Women

July 12th, 2013

It was great to see this article in the New York Times about the emerging trend of tailored, masculine clothing for women.  I’ve been championing the production of heritage style menswear sized for women since the earliest days of the Archival blog.  Of course, Japan, per usual, is ahead of the curve in this area.  Beams Boys regularly features snaps of of female customers sporting menswear inspired ensembles.  Here are a few of my favorite snaps from the Beams flickr feed:

 

Archival Napping

October 9th, 2012
With the advent of Fall, I’m happily adding archival layers to my wardrobe, but I’m also looking back with nostalgia on the warmer, sun weary days of August.  Boston Public Library posted photos of city dwellers from the 1930s napping in public parks – a communal practice that has sadly disappeared in the last seven or so decades.  As someone who shuns tank tops and ostensibly summerweight clothing, I love that most of the nappers, despite the swelter, are fully clothed, wearing long sleeved shirts, long pants and lace up shoes. 

  

 

Archival Utensils

August 31st, 2012

I’ve been shopping from Cornell library’s Human Ecology Historical Photograph collection for new utensil sets. I love the elegant presentation and the grouping of tools by function. Each photograph reminds me of the first frame of an Eadweard Muybridge motion study. I’m waiting for a pair of hands to enter the frame and activate each items use value.

Camping dishes should be light, strong and effective

Strainers of all kinds from a wire basket for blanching to puree strainer for pulping.

Canning: Knives and sharpener, spoons and lifters, Funnels and ladles – all invaluable in preserving and pickling.

Camping: A hunting knife well-sheathed, the not-to-be-forgotten screw driver and pliers, a compass to guide you, with matches protected from the water and even the corkscrew.

Glass ovenware

Equipment – general

Cake and mold pans

From the archives – Dave Falconer/DOCUMERICA

April 4th, 2012

Check out the Documerica – Dave Falconer set on the National Archives flickr photostream. Falconer photographed the impact of the 1970s energy crisis on communities in Washington and Oregon state. It’s hard to imagine a time when business dimmed neon lights during the day or school children rode bikes to field trips because there was not enough gas for school buses. Visit flickr Commons to review the full set and read the photographer’s detailed captions.











Archival Handkerchiefs

January 12th, 2012

As documented, Archival loves kerchiefs. My preference is for discharge printed, polkadot models from Japan and the UK. To diversify my collection, I’m going to shop for a few vintage kerchiefs from Cornell University’s Political Americana Collection. When knotted, the rhetorical content reverts back to pleasing patterns and scrambled text.

Cleveland-Thurman Handkerchief

Benjamin Harrison Handkerchief, 1888

Theodore Roosevelt “Progressive Battle Flag” textile portrait

Benjamin Harrison Handkerchief, 1888

Benjamin Harrison-Morton Handkerchief, 1888

Garfield-Arthur Portrait Textile, ca 1880

Cleveland-Stevenson “Our Candidates 1892 ” Portrait

Taft Tariff Reform handkerchief

Benjamin Harrison-Morton handkerchief, ca 1888

Centennial Celebration by Manhattan Lodge, I.O.B.B.

From the Archives: Women War Workers

March 17th, 2011
“Chippers.” Women war workers of Marinship Corp, 1942


The U.S. National Archives just released these terrific photos of female war workers from WW II. The images are part of NARA’s Women in WW II series. Original captions are included below.

U.S. Army nurses, newly arrived, line the rail of their vessel as it pulls into port of Greenock, Scotland, in European Theater of Operations.

Secretaries, housewives, waitresses, women from all over central Florida are getting into vocational schools to learn war work. Typical are these in the Daytona Beach branch of the Volusia county vocational school., 04/1942

Women man America’s machines in a west coast airplane factory, where the swing shift of drill press operators is composed almost entirely of women., 05/1942

Auxiliaries Ruth Wade and Lucille Mayo (left to right) further demonstrate their ability to service trucks as taught them during the processing period at Fort Des Moines and put into practice at Fort Huachuca, Arizona., 12/08/1942

With the grade and dexterity of a master dressmaker, this young woman fabricates “pup” tents for the expanding war army at the Langdon Tent & Awning Company., ca. 06/1941

Building assault boats for U.S. Marine Corps. by women workers., ca. 12/1941

Training in marksmanship helps girls at Roosevelt High School in Los Angeles, Calif., develop into responsible women. Part of Victory Corps activities there, rifle practice encourages girls to be accurate in handling firearms., 08/1942

Archival Equines

February 22nd, 2011