Archival Clothing - Made in USA

Posts Tagged ‘velocouture’

Archival Bicycles by Spoke Sniffer

December 9th, 2010

Spoke Sniffer’s flickr photostream provides one of the best resources for visual ephemera from the golden era of cycling. Spoke Sniffer collects, or rather, salvages many of his images from eBay where content appears and disappears in a matter weeks. Alongside photographs of famous and ordinary cyclists, Spoke Sniffer documents vintage frames, bicycle parts, product packaging, antique technologies and velocouture.

Here are a few of my favorite selections from the Spoke Sniffer archives:

Fausto Coppi, Age 21

TDF Press

Marcel Jezo

Modern era Grand Bois

1899

Brancale Hairnet

Bicycle of the future

Ideale 92 Diagonale

Vintage Sturmey Archer advert

Lyotard 45 Pedals

Touring outfits

Gnutti splined steel crank

Velocouture

Archival Bicycles by Spoke Sniffer

December 3rd, 2010

Spoke Sniffer’s flickr photostream provides one of the best resources for visual ephemera from the golden era of cycling. Spoke Sniffer collects, or rather, salvages many of his images from eBay where content appears and disappears in a matter weeks. Alongside photographs of famous and ordinary cyclists, Spoke Sniffer documents vintage frames, bicycle parts, product packaging, antique technologies and velocouture.

Here are a few of my favorite selections from the Spoke Sniffer archives:

Fausto Coppi, Age 21

TDF Press

Marcel Jezo

Modern era Grand Bois

1899

Brancale Hairnet

Bicycle of the future

Ideale 92 Diagonale

Vintage Sturmey Archer advert

Lyotard 45 Pedal

Touring outfits

Gnutti splined steel crank

Velocouture

Eugene Tweed Ride 4.26.09

April 27th, 2009










On Sunday, I participated in the second Eugene Tweed ride of 2009 (disclosure: I was not present for Tweed Ride #1 which took place, according to this blog report, in slanting rain). By comparison with the original London Tweed Run, the Eugene version lacked eccentric Brits in matching plus fours and cycling brogues. However, our ride, 15-ish, strong, sported a surprisingly deep range of tweed themed outfits. Several folks even created their own refab knickers from found, thrift store woolens (most notably, this pair of donegal tweed trousers).
There was also an admirable roster of bicycles on the ride including a Kogswell porteur, a pair of Winter customs, a Velo-Orange (mine), Sara’s refurbished Bottecchia, vintage Raleighs and Schwinns, modern-brand uprights and a supporting cast of child bikes and cargo trailers. The optical center of the ride was this custom, wooden trunk-trailer which transported our tea and picnic provisions:



Full flickr set here.

Velocouture in Carefree (Sandrich 1938)

May 11th, 2008

In lieu of synchronized dance moves, Fred and Ginger pursue each other by bicycle in the RKO studio film Carefree.



At this point in my own cycling season, I’d rather pedal in wingtips on my new mixte than participate in the event I signed myself up for in January, that is, the Cascade 1200. In preparation for the ride, I’ve been riding an intensive series of brevets including the 24-hour Fleche Ouragon, the very hilly SIR 400 and two 600ks (ORR and SIR). I’ve survived each ride so far but my body (namely my left shoulder) is beginning to feel like a piece of butchered meat (pulled pork?). Two more weeks for recovery and than I’ll be on my way for real, pedaling non-stop for 4 days (w/sleep breaks??), covering 770 miles if I can keep myself and The Pencil moving in a forward direction. As for couture, I have assembled a mighty force of neckerchiefs and woolen shorts and jerseys and will be investing in both sun blocking arm covers and mountain pass proof sugino resistor booties.

Final issue: Lil Loafer or small Carradice Barley (I’ll be carrying Sara’s Berthoud handlebar bag up front)? Need last minute wind tunnel tests, please.

Bike Rack Fashion: Part One

April 20th, 2006

Though I prefer bikes with lugs, leather saddles and canvas luggage I’m starting to appreciate those ones reflecting elements of contemporary campus bike rack style (what I identify today as a tendency towards slap-dash utility, care worn parts, historical paint schemes and accidental or eccentric ornamentation). Here, I’m sidestepping away from an homage to the emerging herd of ostenisbly stylish bikes (my friends’ bikes–well cared for Japanese and French made ten speeds converted into sporty commuters–often pared down to fixed gears or single speeds). Current campus bike rack style emerges when bikes are locked up and left alone over winter, over the course of an academic term or four year career (or twenty year employment stint). Campus bikes need to be functional, invisible, theft resistant and garbed in some way against wet Oregon weather. Over time, the combination of natural forces and bike rack mayhem (scratching, dinging, jockeying, tipping, falling) work on the surface of the campus bike burnishing its total look and bringing out a quality of (what the folks at Rivendell refer to as) “beausage” or beautiful usage.