Archival Clothing - Made in USA

Archive for the ‘Blog’ Category

Paris-Brest-Paris 2019

August 14th, 2019

I will be offline for a few weeks while I’m away participating in Paris-Brest-Paris for the second time.

Evidence of a getaway….

If you are curious about randonnering, a form of ultra distance cycling w/roots in France, here’s an NPR report on the history of the sport (w/a soundbite at the end by me). I’ll post a gallery when I get back, emphasizing custom bikes, canvas bike bags, roadside eats and wool jerseys.

On the bridge in Brest in 2011
On the bridge in Brest in 2011 with Willy Nevin. We both rode custom Vanillas.
Taking delivery of my PBP rig from builder Corey Thompson. I’ll be riding this bike in 2019.

Handy Bag Pop-Up Report

August 11th, 2019

Thanks to everyone who showed up for our Handy Zip Musette release at The Barnlight in Eugene, Oregon. We’re now sold out of our first production run of bags. A tote is in the works for our next release. Follow our progress on Instagram and contact me to be added to the Handy mailing list.

Handy offerings at the Barnlight
Barnlight owner, Thomas Petit-Czar, and product tester, David
Shiboski and Hollows
Fave makers meeting for the first time (Alison Shiboski and Nicholas Hollows)
David and Lesli at the Barnlight
David and one half of Handy (LL)
Vintage canvas bag and modern Handy bag
Old is new again
Photo of customer's Handy Bag
Send us your bag snaps!

Handy Zip Musettes Now Available

July 14th, 2019

Ordering instructions for Handy bag

Hi friends,

Thank your patience and support of our new project, Handy Bag!

We’re happy to report that a very limited batch of 50 Handy Zip Musettes are now available to order. 

Zip Musette ingredients:

  • 18oz Cotton Canvas Duck
  • Deadstock US Army Cotton Web
  • Sturdy Nickel Hardware
  • Made in Oregon, USA
  • Price: $98.00 + shipping (free local pick up)

Sewn in Springfield, Oregon, the Handy Zip Musette is a simple, sturdy shoulder bag made from heavy duty canvas duck. Originally designed for cyclists, it works equally well for travelers, campers and commuters. 

Here’s what we have in stock:

  • Gray canvas duck w/olive web strap
  • Navy canvas duck w/olive web strap
  • Olive canvas duck w/olive web strap
  • Price: Price:  $98 + shipping (no international orders)

Ordering instructions:

  • Email thbonamici@gmail.com with your desired bag color & quantity.
  • Tom will send you order confirmation and a PayPal invoice

Note: the zippers on these bags are super heavy duty. In the first week of use, you will need to work them back and forth to ease use. They will improve with age. 

Thanks!,

Tom and LesliP.S. Tom and I are doing our best to estimate demand. However, this is our first batch of Handy bags and we may sell out early for a particular color. Once we sell out the first batch, we will assess demand and prep a new order.

Handy Bag is coming in July!

July 4th, 2019

Handy Bag will release its first cycling-type musette in July.

Our first Handy bag batch is in production at T & J Custom Sewing in Springfield, Oregon.

Our first model will be the Handy Musette, a simple, functional, cycling-type shoulder bag made from canvas duck, sturdy hardware and cotton webbing.

How do you buy a bag?

We will be holding a pop up show in Eugene, Oregon, at The Barnlight, on Friday, July 12. 

We will also send out an email notice w/online ordering instructions for those who are not located locally.

If you would like to order a bag or be notified when the bags are ready for sale, email me to be added to the mailing list (archivalblogger@gmail.com).

You can also follow us on my Archival Instagram account for more updates and production shots.

Terry Shuck sewing our first run of Handy Musettes

Follow us on my Archival Instagram account for more updates and production shots.

Announcing Handy Bag

April 4th, 2019

Since Archival closed, Tom and I have been meeting for pizza and plotting a new bag brand. We love bags and still think the world is missing a few models.

Our latest project is called Handy Bag (or Handy for short).

We’re keeping things simple, functional, affordable and durable.

In May, we will be releasing one bag, a zip top musette, in two colorways: olive and gray.

Our ingredient list will look familiar to Archival Clothing fans: canvas duck, metal hardware/rivets and zippers, and cotton webbing.

This time, we’re sourcing materials that are easier to buy in smaller quantities and lend themselves to repurposing across multiple models. Look for bags made of dry finish canvas duck in a narrower range of colors and metal hardware in nickel rather than brass.

As with Archival, Handy bags will be sewn in Springfield, Oregon, by a top quality shop that specializing in heavy duty product offerings for the bike industry (Terry Shuck, the owner, used to work for Burley design).

Where will you find Handy?

Tom and I kicked around the idea of managing everything by mail order ala Zo bags.

Zo Bike Messenger bags
Mail order inspiration: Zo Bag order form from the 1990s

Instead, we’re collecting emails and planning to send out an announcement once the first bags are ready for sale (most likely in early May). We will also keep followers updated on our assorted social channels.

For the time being, we are keeping everything small scale and fun. In the end, we’re making bags that our missing from our own collections. Reversing a popular U/X mantra: we are our end users (and very best customers).

We will also be hosting a pop up show in Eugene, Oregon, in May (details TBD).

Email me (archivalblogger@gmail.com) if you would like to be added to our mailing list.

Also, if you want to stay posted on our project, keep an eye on the Archival blog and follow us on Instagram @tombonamici @gridwax @archivalclothing


Tom selecting canvas duck for our first production run
Tom selecting canvas duck for our first production run



plans to restart something small and sustainable. We missed making bags that

Engineered Garments x Barbour

March 6th, 2019

What are your expectations for an iconic brand collaboration? In the case of Barbour x Engineered Garments, I’m looking for more of a Shackleton crackup, corduroy collar meets crazy pocketing. These jackets are a little subdued for my tastes, a too polite exchange of zippers, snaps & fabric.

ENGINEERED GARMENTS X BARBOUR
Thompson Jacket
ENGINEERED GARMENTS X BARBOUR
Thompson Jacket

ENGINEERED GARMENTS X BARBOUR
Thompson Jacket
ENGINEERED GARMENTS X BARBOUR
Thompson Jacket
Arthur Waistcoat (Engineerd Garments x Barbour)
Arthur Waistcoat (Engineerd Garments x Barbour)
Arthur Waistcoat (Engineerd Garments x Barbour)
ENGINEERED GARMENTS X BARBOUR
Irving Jacket
ENGINEERED GARMENTS X BARBOUR
Irving Jacket
ENGINEERED GARMENTS X BARBOUR
South Jacket
ENGINEERED GARMENTS X BARBOUR
South Jacket
ENGINEERED GARMENTS X BARBOUR
South Jacket
ENGINEERED GARMENTS X BARBOUR
Unlined Graham Jacket

ENGINEERED GARMENTS X BARBOUR
Unlined Graham Jacket

Beams Boy Office Style Fair

March 2nd, 2019

Office style, by Beams Boy

A spot check on the Beams Boy Instastory redirected me to this curious “office style fair” capsule collection. I’m still trying to put my finger on the persona or segment archetype represented by this clothing.

My guess: Jules and Jim meets Tokyo librarian.

Archival DIY: Reproofing Waxed Cotton (updated)

March 1st, 2019
Martexin reproofing wax. Operating instructions on the can.

Archival Clothing endorses waxed cotton because it’s a rugged, natural, water resistant fabric that requires only wax reproofing to maintain its finish. Waxed cotton users should know how to reprooof their jackets, hats, and bags. Both Filson and Barbour offer factory reproofing services but we recommend performing the work yourself (at least once). Reproofing waxed cotton is relatively easy and personalizes the care and maintenance of your garment. Even if you live in the desert, you should establish a reproofing schedule for your waxed cotton. Reproofing extends the life of waxed cotton and prevents it from developing the folds and wear lines that often lead to holes.

I do my reproofing in August so I can move the work outdoors.

Basic tools: wax (warmed), water, sponge, blow dryer (or heat gun). If you’re using our 1.5 ounce tin, spoon some wax into a bowl and heat briefly in microwave. Some people recommend using Filson wax, say, with a Filson product, but I’ve switched between several brands of wax treatment (Filson, Barbour and Martinex) with the same results. I will concede that for a full reproofing job on a jacket, the larger tins of Barbour reproofing wax are easier to heat in a double boiler.

Dab off dirt with a moistened sponge. Do not use soaps or detergents.

Use clean sponge to spread warmed reproofing wax thinly on fabric. Short strokes work best.

Reheat surface of item with blow dryer to melt the wax into the fabric.

Reapply wax until it evenly coats the bag.
Restored to original factory finish
I still have wax left so I’m reproofing a couple of my Filson duckbill caps
You’ll be moving back and forth between wax applications and the blow dryer
Don’t expect the wax to glaze evenly over fabric. You’ll need to work it into the surface.

 

There! You’ve shopped from yourself. These rewaxed hats are better than new. Let the sun help w/the final reproofing. Use a blow dryer again if you find any remaining, unmelted spots of wax. If you’ve overdone it, fear not, daily use and rain will wear down the excess wax.

Hender Scheme reverse nylon cap

February 27th, 2019

It’s winter and I’m months away from wearing anything made out of ultralight nylon. However, I’m curious about this Hender Scheme trail cap that was recently featured in a recent Takanna e-newsletter (the only Gmail inbox promotions folder fodder I don’t delete). I love that the cap is reversible, pocketable, and unstructured — things that make it perfect for dry weather hiking, flyfishing or cycling (as an under-helmet sun shade).

Bonus: the adjustable cinch cord gives the cap a surprising bit of adjustability. I’m also a fan of the low crown and floppy brim. Glad to see some brands moving away from stiff peeked, rigid brimmed trucker hats (ugh).

Complaint: I’m not wild about the large leather logo patch, but that’s a detail that could easily be tweezered away.

“Origin is Everything”: Rin Project Cycling Sweaters

February 12th, 2019

Each refresh of the Japanese cycling outfitter Rin Project site reveals a new product obsession: wool cycling sweaters, retro hairnets, knicker hose, mod coats, leather cycling shoes and Brompton compatible shoulder satchels.

My top Rin Project product pick is this cycling pullover with retro-inspired front carrying pockets and wool sourced from the UK. It reminds me of the derby tweed sweaters that Rivendell Bicycle Works used to make in the 1990s.

This is the sweater to wear during your recreation of the Tyneside endurance test.