Archival Clothing - Made in USA

Archive for the ‘Shopping From The Present’ Category

New A/W releases: Bshop inc.

October 14th, 2019

In 2019, it’s hard for me to get excited about fall product releases. So many of my favorite heritage brands (and shops) have either disappeared or morphed beyond recognition (releasing so may products, collaborations and must-haves that it is nearly impossible to locate items from their core lines)(suddenly: brass match holders and Bison hair drink cozies).

Perhaps the only place where I still eagerly shop for seasonal releases is Japan. Specifically, I check in with B-shop, a web/brick and mortar store specializing in simple, classic, well made clothing and housewares from Europe and the UK. Each fall, I point my web browser to Bshop online, anticipating the exciement of seeing new collaborations, updated product lines, brand mixes and refreshed lookbooks. Sometimes, a seasonal tweak comes in the subtlest of forms: buttons are replaced with snaps, cotton is swapped out for black watch wool or canvas duck transforms into patent leather.

Bshop also wins my heart for offering almost all of their garb in unisex sizes. They also host curated offerings from Labour and Wait.

Here are a few of my fave A/W 19 offerings:

Brady Brady 130th Anniversary Ariel Trout
Vetra

Handy Bag is coming in July!

July 4th, 2019

Handy Bag will release its first cycling-type musette in July.

Our first Handy bag batch is in production at T & J Custom Sewing in Springfield, Oregon.

Our first model will be the Handy Musette, a simple, functional, cycling-type shoulder bag made from canvas duck, sturdy hardware and cotton webbing.

How do you buy a bag?

We will be holding a pop up show in Eugene, Oregon, at The Barnlight, on Friday, July 12. 

We will also send out an email notice w/online ordering instructions for those who are not located locally.

If you would like to order a bag or be notified when the bags are ready for sale, email me to be added to the mailing list (archivalblogger@gmail.com).

You can also follow us on my Archival Instagram account for more updates and production shots.

Terry Shuck sewing our first run of Handy Musettes

Follow us on my Archival Instagram account for more updates and production shots.

Announcing Handy Bag

April 4th, 2019

Since Archival closed, Tom and I have been meeting for pizza and plotting a new bag brand. We love bags and still think the world is missing a few models.

Our latest project is called Handy Bag (or Handy for short).

We’re keeping things simple, functional, affordable and durable.

In May, we will be releasing one bag, a zip top musette, in two colorways: olive and gray.

Our ingredient list will look familiar to Archival Clothing fans: canvas duck, metal hardware/rivets and zippers, and cotton webbing.

This time, we’re sourcing materials that are easier to buy in smaller quantities and lend themselves to repurposing across multiple models. Look for bags made of dry finish canvas duck in a narrower range of colors and metal hardware in nickel rather than brass.

As with Archival, Handy bags will be sewn in Springfield, Oregon, by a top quality shop that specializing in heavy duty product offerings for the bike industry (Terry Shuck, the owner, used to work for Burley design).

Where will you find Handy?

Tom and I kicked around the idea of managing everything by mail order ala Zo bags.

Zo Bike Messenger bags
Mail order inspiration: Zo Bag order form from the 1990s

Instead, we’re collecting emails and planning to send out an announcement once the first bags are ready for sale (most likely in early May). We will also keep followers updated on our assorted social channels.

For the time being, we are keeping everything small scale and fun. In the end, we’re making bags that our missing from our own collections. Reversing a popular U/X mantra: we are our end users (and very best customers).

We will also be hosting a pop up show in Eugene, Oregon, in May (details TBD).

Email me (archivalblogger@gmail.com) if you would like to be added to our mailing list.

Also, if you want to stay posted on our project, keep an eye on the Archival blog and follow us on Instagram @tombonamici @gridwax @archivalclothing


Tom selecting canvas duck for our first production run
Tom selecting canvas duck for our first production run



plans to restart something small and sustainable. We missed making bags that

Catch and Release: Mister Freedom Chore Coats

July 18th, 2018

For gents, there is no shortage of chore coats in fascinating cuts and fabrics. Here are a few of my faves on offer (and on sale) from Mister Freedom (via Self Edge). Also, I need to know: who is this handsome, bearded, deadpan, denim fit model? What memory traces does he carry, having worn so many amazing, high dollar workwear garments over the years? What is his daily (after hours) uniform?

Mister Freedom Belleville – Covert Stripe

Mister Freedom Belleville Jacket – Covert Stripes

Mister Freedom Belleville Jacket

Mister Freedom Conductor Jacket

Patchwork Dreams

July 11th, 2018

I spotted this patchwork chore coat from Tigre Brocante last Fall. Unfortunately, a half year later, the jacket (nicely styled for men and women), has disappeared from the site.  You may not be able to buy this jacket, but you can still mimic the look. Check out Corridor’s Duck Dyed Overshirts (on sale) as a worthy, patch-free alternate. Pair w/Corridor Bucket Hat and Troentorp (mandatory style staple) for a seasonless, timeless, unisex ensemble.

 

Shopping from Japan: Danton Chore Coat

February 25th, 2018

I’m tapped out after a trip to Japan. Nevertheless, I’m saving up my shekels for a new Danton chore coat. Danton, a French brand licensed for distribution in France, offers sturdy, unisex work clothing for men and women in staple fabrics including poplin, cotton, and now, sturdy moleskin. Danton, like Engineered Garments, produces a line of stock styles in a seasonal refresh of heritage fabrics. Find your Danton via Zozotown,  Rakuten, or B-shop (a proxy shopping service like Sutocorp may be required).

In a bag rut? Buy a Brady Nevis!

June 20th, 2017

Scouting Rakuten, I spotted this curious looking Brady Nevis backpack (which reminds me a bit of something a character from 400 Blows would carry). My house is filled with Rubbermaid bins of bags (Archival, Brady, Filson, Hunting World, Bertram Mann, Zo, Domke, etc.). I don’t need a single new bag – and yet – I am always open to curious mashups of stock bag styles (Rucksack meets a messenger bag, the movie!).  Brady bags are never cheap and there are quite a few classic models that I’m hoping to aquire (the Gelderburn and MacLaren to name a few). However, I’m tempted to save up and nab a Nevis before they disappear from the market. This model appears to be one of those frustrating, Japan only iterations: available via a few web shops and than slated to taunt you as “product unavailable” when you launch your Google search – a few years too late.

 

Archival recommends: Gamine brand denim for women

May 27th, 2017

Denim for women is tricky. After many years, I have narrowed my own brand make/model preferences down to Levi’s LVC 501 (1947), Rogue Territory Stanton, and Sugar Cane 1947. I prefer old school, mile wide leg openings, high rises, and huge cuffs. I’m a not-so-curvy, shortish woman, so I can get away with modifying men’s models to fit my body. That being said, many friends ask me what jeans I like and what to buy. Rather than sending them on an impossible journey of denim discovery (minimum five year timeline), I’m trying to short circuit the search process and drum up some readymade recommendations.

Criteria: denim that is well made, durable, washable, stylish, and includes historical design features. Pricepoint is a separate issue. Most friends are willing to pay under $200 for what they identify as premium denim. Women who are looking for workwear for use outdoors may wish to pay less (given that the pennies-per-wear model stategy doesn’t really work when you are replacing your jeans every six months or so).

My current denim workwear recommendation is Gamine. Gamine started out producing denim for gardeners.  They have expanded their audience to “geologists, farmers, and weekend warriors.”

I recommend the flagship Slim Slouch Dungaree.

The model is custom made and comes in three fits: Straight, Demi, Bold.

Pricepoint: $150.00

The pants are a throwback classic Carhartt and Filson workpants. Lots of patch pocketing. Double fabric at the knees. White Oak denim. All material elements made in the USA.

If you prefer khakis, Gamine is collaborating with legend Dickies (and legendary company archivist, Ann Richardson) on a new model (coming in June): the Sweetwater Trouser