Archival Clothing - Made in USA

Posts Tagged ‘Barbour for women’

#Farmcore

October 23rd, 2016

Searching for generic images for a U/X personas project, I happened upon the Exactitudes¬†project featuring typologies of people who wear similar uniforms. My fave typology from Exactitudes is the one featuring a group identified as “farmcore.” From afar, the only thing that seems to identify someone as farmcore is wearing a Barbour jacket. Things that I love about the photo series: the fit of the jackets (it’s ok to be a jacket to be oversized), the emphasis on older Barbour coats (Borders and Beauforts), and the individual styling. Take a look:

151_05-1151_12

151_10

151_09

151_08

151_04 151_01

151_06

Archival Keeperwear

October 19th, 2011
Shopping from 2001: Barbour Keeperwear Jacket

I don’t hunt but I love the purpose-built features of a well made shooting jacket. Juliette, owner of Hub & Bespoke, recommends the Barbour quilted nylon Keeperwear, a jacket that has been in the Barbour product line for over a decade. The Keeperwear resembles the classic Liddesdale but comes with features that make it handy for both hunting and bike commuting: a rear carrying pocket, snap closures, raglan sleeves for ease of movement, protective shoulder patches to prevent bag abrasion, large hand warmer pockets and rear snap gussets. Barbour wax jackets can be too warm for cycling. The Keeperwear quilt, on the other hand, provides rain repellency while remaining highly breathable. I buy my quilts a size up so I can layer them over multiple sweaters and vests.

Updated Barbour Keeperwear (2011)

Stud fastening rear game pouch

Discontinued Keeperwear jacket for women via Sierra Trading Post

Waistcoat version also available

A decorative pin for your lapel (via ebay)

Shopping from the past: Barbour jackets

February 2nd, 2011
Aspirational layering (zippers, webbing, waxed cotton and wool)

For a little winter cheer, I’m reprinting pages from my favorite Barbour print catalog from the early 1990s. Compared to current offerings, the catalog presents a minimalist collection of jackets. Each has a specific, distinctive feature making it unique to the line. Once you memorize this catalog you’ll be able to distinguish between models based on fabric weight (light or heavyweight waxed cotton), lining (wool or cotton), pocketing (size, type and placement), length and snap gusseting (none, double or single). Synthetics are non-existent save for the quilted waistcoats and shooting jackets meant to be worn as jacket liners. The catalog’s visual presentation of the product line is exemplary. Female models are mixed into the story world without overly feminizing their looks. Almost every jacket is paired with a signature bag and breed of dog. For instance, I’m thrilled to see that the Moorland, a Barbour favorite, gets the Weimaraner treatment. Sadly, many of my favorite, more exotic models have disappeared from view including the Solway Zip, Longshoreman smock, Northumbria and Spey wading jacket. Let’s see if we can pester Barbour into bringing a few back in broader size range.

Take a look.

An all time favorite

The pockets on the Border are vast

Proposing a Barbour reissue in sizes down to XXS






Synthetic exceptions
I’d like to recreate this bag tangle with my own collection

STP Salvage: Barbour and John Partridge

February 8th, 2009
Archival clothing excavations from Sierra Trading Post (discontinued and close-out items soon to be disappearing from view).

Wool Donegal Sweater
Keeperwear Quilt Jacket (for Women)
New Classic Eskdale Jacket

Newfoundland Quilt
Vintage Wax Beaufort


Linhope Shooting Vest (for Women)

Barbour Beauchamp Waterproof

Country Tweed Pullover

John Partridge Linchfield Vest

John Partridge Tuareg Hooded Jacket
John Partridge Rhino Tank Jacket (for Women)

And a submission to the retail category Why Was it Made?

Barbour Quilted Shoulder Tote